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How can I access my inner wisdom?

William Stillman
Health Education

You can access your inner wisdom by committing to a process of elevating your consciousness throughout the flow of your daily existence. This requires time and patience as it is rarely an expedited process.

Accessing your inner wisdom can be conceived as an "awakening" or a "reintroduction" with one's self---so many people suppress the relationship they have with this aspect of their personality (i.e. that inner, instructive voice) for being overwhelmed, distracted or consumed with pursuing selfish wants.

Begin to elevate your awareness with a commitment to daily prayer and meditation. If you feel as though you lack the discipline to stick to it, pair up with someone or a group at the same time and place every day. Expand your thinking beyond yourself to silently consider your place in the grand scheme of the Universe; give thanks and praise for the gifts and blessings bestowed upon you; and express gratitude for the beauty of all you survey.

Gradually lengthen the amount of time you invest in this process. If you start out with only a few minutes at bedtime, expand this to include a few moments after supper or early in the morning when things are quiet. In time, you can extend this way of thinking into a state of perpetual meditation, or thoughtfulness, throughout the day in how you conduct yourself in all your interactions.

Accessing your inner wisdom may also bring unexpected benefits in the form of revelations for gifts or traits unrealized, such as a heightened intuition or a greater empathy and compassion. Accessing your inner wisdom is your birth-right; tap into it with reverence and regard, and a desire to serve others through its employ.

Arianna Huffington
Health Education

"I felt it better to speak to God than about him," said Saint Therèse of Lisieux. Speaking to God demands solitude. We can commune with God through our communion with others. But we also long to commune with our spiritual selves directly, to seek the truth about the world by withdrawing from it.

 

When I decided to go beyond my books and my intellect, and try to gain access to my intuition and inner wisdom, I began to set aside some time every day not to read about God, not to talk about God, not even to talk to God, but to listen. The Quakers call it "quiet time." The Jesuits call it "spiritual exercises." Thomas Merton called it "contemplation." Christians have for centuries called it prayer.  And millions today call it “meditation.”

 

Quietly waiting for God is not a novel idea, any more than eating is an innovative response to hunger. But quiet and solitude are rare commodities. We are wired, plugged in 24/7.  After a while we become terrified of the silence, unaware of what it has to offer. We drown out the simple questions of God with the simplistic sound-bites of man.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.