Men's Preventative Health & Wellness

Men's Preventative Health & Wellness

Men's Preventative Health & Wellness
At all stages of life, men can take measures to be their healthiest. Sometimes all you need is an annual physical exam, but men who have a family history of certain cancers or diseases may want to be screened earlier. With regular doctor visits men can monitor their overall health and keeps tabs on everything from cholesterol levels to prostate health. Get more information about men's health and wellness and find out when to get checked for heart disease, colorectal cancer and other medical conditions with expert advice from Sharecare.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recommends four ways for men to stay on top of their game when it comes to their health:
    • See your doctor for checkups. Certain diseases and conditions may not have symptoms. Your doctor can help identify issues early or before they can become a problem.
    • Pay attention to signs and symptoms, including chest pain, shortness of breath, excessive thirst, and problems with urination. If you have these symptoms or any others, see your doctor.
    • Keep track of your numbers. Readings for blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), and other health measurements are very important. If your numbers are too high or too low, your doctor can explain what they mean and suggest how you can get them to a healthier range. Be sure to ask your doctor what tests you need and how often you need them.
    • Get vaccinated. Everyone needs immunizations to stay healthy, no matter their age. Even if you were vaccinated as a child, you may need updates. Immunity can fade with time. Vaccine recommendations are based on a range of factors, including age, overall health and your medical history.
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Oncology, answered
    Men in their 40s may be screened for prostate cancer when they are at high risk.
    African American men and men who have a first-degree relative (father, brother, or son) diagnosed with prostate cancer at an early age (younger than age 65) should discuss the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of prostate cancer screening with a doctor, starting at age 45.
    This discussion should take place at age 40 for men at even higher risk (those with several first-degree relatives who had prostate cancer at an early age).
    After this discussion, those men who want to be screened should be tested with the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test. The digital rectal exam (DRE) may also be done as a part of screening.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The following is a checklist of medical tests for men that should be done yearly, unless otherwise indicated:

    At age fifteen, you should get the following:
    • Blood pressure measurement (yearly, or more frequently)
    • A dental exam yearly and teeth cleaning every six months or as indicated
    At age twenty-five, you should also get the following:
    • LDL (low-density lipoprotein), also known as bad cholesterol, level (you want it to be less than 100 mg/dl) every five years
    • HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, also known as good cholesterol, level (you want it to be higher than 45 mg/dl) every five years
    • Fasting triglyceride level (you want it to be less than 100 mg/dl) every five years
    • C-reactive protein, an indicator of inflammation in the body, (you want to test "normal") every five years
    • A screen for diabetes (if you are overweight)
    At age thirty, you should continue the tests above and, in addition, get the following:
    • A screen for thyroid disease
    • A test for diabetes and every five years thereafter
    At age forty, you should continue the tests above and, in addition, get the following:
    • A Hemoccult, a test for occult (hidden) blood in the feces
    • An eye examination and every three years till age 60, then yearly
    At age fifty, you should continue the tests above and, in addition, get the following:
    • A rectal examination for screening for rectal cancer and prostate cancer
    • A colonoscopy (to rule out colon cancer) and every three to five years thereafter
    • A PSA or prostate-specific antigen (a blood test for prostate cancer) and every year thereafter, if you and your doc agree on this course of action and what you will do if you have an abnormal reading
    At age sixty, you should continue the tests above and, in addition, get the following:
    • A bone density test
    • A screen for thyroid disease
    • Tests for memory
  • 2 Answers
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    Men should see a doctor for many reasons. In general, a regular visit to a doctor will allow for appropriate screenings for diseases that can be caught and treated early. This will also allow a man to catch up on vaccines that can prevent him from getting sick as he gets older (vaccines aren't just for children).
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    In general, a male 50 years and over should have a couple of blood tests done at least once: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C (if born between 1945 and 1965). Cholesterol levels should be tested. Also, men over 50 should begin screening for colorectal cancer. Annual to biannual blood pressure checks are important as well.

    Other tests may be important, depending on the man's lifestyle and habits; these include tests for sexually transmitted diseases, diabetes and complications of alcohol or drug use and smoking.
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    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    Men hassle with scheduled oil changes and smog certifications, but resist simple doctor’s visits. Indeed, many men haven’t seen a doctor in the past five years and don’t have a regular source of health care. They practice an “if it’s not broken why fix it” attitude toward their own bodies. And, it doesn’t pay off.
    • Men die seven years younger than women. That's at least in part due to their lack of attention to preventative care.
    • Men have a much higher risk of dying from heart attacks, cancer, accidents, complications of diabetes and stroke than do women.
    Why do men avoid the doctor's office? Maybe doctors do not educate them. Or maybe it's that society pressures them to be or act tough, and not admit that they are weak or vulnerable.

    Regardless of the explanation, if you're a man, you need to step up to the plate, and take care of the only vehicle you will have for life. If the thought of becoming a vintage collectible isn’t enough to inspire meticulous self-care, think about the people who love you and need you for the long haul. Drive to the doctor’s office and get a checkup. But don’t get caught speeding.

    This content originally appeared on http://blog.mountainstar.com/
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    A answered
    A testicular self-examination is the best way to keep your testicles healthy. Starting to touch your testicles when you are still young will give you a baseline of what a normal testicle feels like. If you feel something different as you get older it would be time to call your healthcare practitioner. Want to know how to do a testicular self-check (examination) correctly? Check out the video and print guide at: http://selfchec.org/main/self-checks/cancers/testicular-cancer/
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    In general, the answer is no.

    Despite the number of vitamins and supplements that claim to promote prostate health, there is little proof to support their use.

    They don't help prostate cancer, prostatitis (inflammation and infection of the prostate) or benign enlargement of the prostate gland. In fact, when many of the popular supplements, such as saw palmetto, have been tested, the results have shown no benefit.

    Popular remedies that have been promoted for prostate health include:
    • zinc supplements
    • vitamin E
    • selenium
    • soy
    • some general herbal remedies that are supposed to decrease the rate of cancer, help with urination and promote sexual health
    None of these have any scientific support. And actual harm has been associated with selenium and Vitamin E.

    The one vitamin supplement that is helpful is vitamin D. There is evidence that this vitamin has many positive effects, including the possibility that it can reduce the risk of prostate cancer. (Generally, you need 400 to 1000 units per day of vitamin D.)

    Because of these reasons, the general advice is to save your money when it comes to taking prostate supplements.

    If you tried one of the supplements and it had a positive effect, I would be encouraged and think you should consider continuing it, even though the data does not support its use in the general population. But you want to be sure that the all the ingredients are safe.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    It’s easy to say that the man in your life should probably be going to the doctor more, but it’s another thing to get him to do it. Here are a few tips for getting even the most stalwart in for a checkup:
    • Express your concern. This might seem simple, but sometimes just letting a man know you’re concerned about his health can give him a reason to go to the doctor. Letting the man in your life know you’re worried about his prostate cancer risk might get him thinking he should be, too.
    • Give him different reasons. Sometimes it can be tough to get someone to see the light, especially when the person you’re worried about might not think there’s a problem. Don’t be deterred. Try a different tack if others haven’t worked. For example, if doing it “for your health” isn’t enough, try suggesting he see someone just to confirm he really does know what’s going on with his body. You could even mention that an annual doctor's visit has the bonus of getting a little bit of time away from work.
    • Tell him to do some research. If a man is adamant there’s nothing wrong, ask him to do some searching around on the web first. This is especially useful for mental illness, which can be very isolating. Finding out other people are getting help for going through something similar normalizes seeking medical attention.
    • Remind him that he's taking control of his health. Hoping you aren’t sick isn’t a great way to hold the reins of your health. A doctor can give you tools to put you behind the steering wheel instead. Take testicular cancer as an example. When done properly, regular testicular exams are an excellent way to detect cancer early. Once a man learns how to do the exam, he shouldn’t need to see the doctor about testicular cancer unless he finds something. With a single visit, he's gained the power to monitor his health.
    • Make sure he knows that regular checkups often mean fewer visits (eventually). While you might feel healthy, everyone eventually ends up at the doctor. Going once or twice a year could save the man in your life many more visits and a possible hospital stay once he's forced to see someone.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
  • 2 Answers
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    During a prostate exam, the doctor positions you either on your side or bent over and inserts his index finger into your rectum to check for prostate abnormalities. Although this may be an uncomfortable test, in many men it is important to have prostate exams. Talk to your doctor for more information.
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