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    A , Sports Medicine, answered

    Andropause is considered the male equivalent of female menopause. In andropause, men will start to experience a wide variety of symptoms. The symptoms are divided into 4 categories; psychological, sexual, physical and metabolic. Because the list of symptoms is very extensive, you don’t need to have every symptom to be diagnosed. The most common symptoms of Andropause are:  fatigue, increase muscle soreness, loss of muscle strength and tone, decrease stamina, decrease sex drive, loss of morning erections, decrease ability to obtain and maintain erections, loss of creativity, loss of self esteem, a feeling of hopelessness, depression and more.

    The cause of Andropause is due to declining levels testosterone production by the testicles. As these levels decrease the above symptoms will start to manifest. One may have a few or multiple. Some of the symptoms of Andropause will overlap with other medical conditions. Thus, you may want to seek a medical evaluation rather than self diagnose.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Walnuts, an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, are known to boost dopamine and arginine levels in the brain, which increases the production of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is the essential chemical compound for erections; it dilates the blood vessels, allowing blood to travel freely.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    The pioneering sex researchers Masters and Johnson first developed this four-stage model for understanding male sexual response back in the 1960s and it still holds true today:
    • Excitement: Excitement starts with stimulation. That stimulation can be physical (your touch, masturbation, or some other type of contact with the penis or other part of the body), or mental and emotional (fantasy, thoughts about you, pornography, or simply gazing at a sexy billboard). Virtually anything can provide emotional fuel for an erection, depending on what a guy finds arousing.
    • Plateau: A man's excitement tends to plateau or level off before he gets even more aroused. During this phase, his body approaches orgasm and he usually has a full erection. As he gets ready to come, his abs and thighs tighten, his hands and feet clench, and his breath gets quicker and more uneven.
    • Orgasm: For many people, this third stage is the best part of sex. During orgasm, all that tension that's been building up is finally released. The physical signs that started in the plateau phase -- higher blood pressure, rapid breathing, muscle contractions -- kick into overdrive. This is also when a man crosses his point of ejaculatory inevitability and can't stop himself from climaxing, no matter what.
    • Resolution: The final phase of sexual response occurs after your guy's orgasm. It's basically a time for his body to relax: The tension seeps out of his muscles, his blood pressure sinks, and his excitement dissipates. Lots of men feel sleepy during resolution and -- unless he's a teenager -- his penis will also take a break. This time, during which his body recovers after orgasm and he can't get an erection again right away, varies depending on his age and is called the refractory period.
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    The four-stage model for understanding male sexual response is excitement, plateau, orgasm, and response.

    After the excitement phase, a man's excitement tends to plateau or level off before he gets even more aroused. During this phase, his body approaches orgasm and he usually has a full erection. As he gets ready to come, his abs and thighs tighten, his hands and feet clench, and his breath gets quicker and more uneven.
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    A man's sexual inhibition system (SIS) puts the brakes on his sexuality. Research suggests there are actually two different types of SIS. One responds to performance anxiety -- his fear of erectile dysfunction, for example. That's called SIS-1. His SIS-2 responds to his fear of negative consequences from sex, like sexually transmitted diseases and unintended pregnancy.

    Like the sexual excitement system (SES) that constantly scans his environment, thoughts and feelings for things that may be sexually appealing, the SIS also constantly scans his environment, in this case for turn-offs. Sounds like a downer, but the SIS can come in handy: It's what saves a man from getting an erection during a meeting with his boss or a family dinner.
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    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    Interestingly, many parents don't want their children to look different from their fathers or brothers or even from their peers at school. In fact, nine out of 10 male infants of circumcised fathers are circumcised. Also, about 75% of male infants of fathers who are uncircumcised are also uncircumcised.
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    A , Urology, answered
    What can men do to feel happier, less stressed out and less anxious?
    Getting more sleep, eating a healthy diet, getting into shape, and enjoying your sex life are all ways men can reduce stress and feel happier. Watch me discuss the lifestyle changes men should make to combat anxiety.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Although slang for an erect penis may indicate otherwise, the human is one of the few mammals that doesn't have a bone in the penis. Many animals have a bone structure called the bacula to help them achieve and maintain erections; humans don't have them because they're cumbersome and prone to injury and because they've developed a better system. The human's penis works on a transportation system of veins and arteries that supply blood to the organ to make it erect.

    Because men don't have bony structures that could get in the way, they can have a disproportionately large penis for their bodies. Really. Compared to many other primates, the human penis is larger. This helps with attracting child-bearing partners.

    But the trade-off is that the human male's testes are tiny compared to other species like chimpanzees.

    When a female chimp goes into heat, she copulates with as many males as she can in order to ensure that she produces offspring. All the adult males then protect the child because it could be theirs. So chimp testes need to be big to produce large quantities of sperm because their sperm fight with other sperm for the right to the egg.

    Because human males theoretically don't have to compete with other men, their testes don't need to produce an oil rig's worth of sperm. Their testes don't need to be as large (and thank goodness-considering how many times men's groins have been greeted by an errant baseball).
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    Men can develop a decline in hormone levels similar to women experiencing menopause, albeit more subtle and less acute. Starting around the age of 40, men experience a drop in testosterone levels. It is estimated that 30% of men over 50 have testosterone levels low enough to put them at risk for  "Andropause."

    On the other hand, there are many men who have low testosterone to begin with, be it because of chromosomal disorders or other, external factors.

    Men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer may also have - intentionally - decreased testosterone levels. While the low levels are good for prostate cancer, there are significant metabolic effects that need to be monitored. While the natural decline in testosterone levels is often referred to as Andropause, the general term for patients with low testosterone for any reason is hypogonadism.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Men don’t get hot flashes, but they may get too cool, at least when it comes to sexual desire. As men age, their testosterone levels take a slow-motion nosedive, and sexual desire, including the ability to get an erection, can fizzle. Unlike menopause in women, male menopause doesn’t come on like a tsunami. Male menopause is subtle like a tide going out. This natural transition also affects men differently. Low testosterone levels affect about one in eight men in their 50s, one in four in their 60s, nearly one in three in their 70s, and half of men in their 80s.
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