Menopause

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    The various solutions to hot flashes which you can try are:
    • Keishi-bukuryo-gan - Try keishi-bukuryo-gan, which translates as cinnamon mushroom tablet, a popular treatment in Japan where 40 million doses are prescribed each year. Available at Asian grocery stores for about $8, Keishi-bukuryo-gan tea should be taken three times a day as a treatment.
    • Chilled Pillows - Hot flashes that occur at night - night sweats - can cause plenty   of sleep deprivation. Try a chilled pillow filled with a cold-water insert, available at department stores for about $25. It'll keep your head cool, regulate body temperature, and aid sleep.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    What should I do if I have post-menopausal vaginal bleeding?
    No matter the amount of post-menopausal vaginal bleeding, a woman should see her doctor. In this video, Darcy Bryan, MD, of Riverside Community Hospital, shares what concerns may arise from this type of bleeding.
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Why would a woman need to see a gynecologist after menopause?
    Regular gynecology visits shouldn't stop once a woman reaches menopause, says OB/GYN Karin Stanton, DO, from Brandon Regional Hospital. Watch as she explains the reasons why.
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    A , Advanced Practice Nursing, answered
    Findings from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study showed a doubling of the risks for signs of early dementia in women using menopause hormone therapy after the age of 65. This is not the typical age group where hormone use is recommended, and long-term data is not available to corroborate the finding of actual development of dementia. The risk of dementia from hormone use is younger women is not clear but appears to be absent or decreased. 
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    There may be changes in body fat distribution and body composition due to hormonal changes occurring during the menopausal transition. However reduced physical activity as women get closer to menopause is the main culprit for increase in weight gain. It is really important to keep yourself active during these days! 
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    Can an active, healthy sex life help reduce menopause symptoms?
    An active, healthy sex life can help women live a longer, happier life! In this video, OB/GYN specialist Tara Allmen, MD, confirms that having more sex can help alleviate menopause symptoms, and contribute to a longer, more satisfying life. 
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    On average, women put on 1.5 to 4 pounds per year after age 50. A few extra pounds in a year don’t seem like a lot, but if you gain five pounds a year starting when you are 45, by age 55 you are looking at 50 extra pounds! However, it isn’t the lack of estrogen that puts on the pounds, but midlife changes in metabolism and lifestyle. Women who continue to menstruate until they are in their late fifties also start to gain weight even though their ovaries have not shut down. Estrogen does affect the distribution of weight, so you can blame menopause if you suddenly have a muffin top even if you haven’t gained a pound!
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    If you find you are having trouble remembering where you put your keys or your purse, don't panic. Many women experience memory and concentration problems during perimenopause and after menopause. Some scientists believe that you may be able to minimize these memory problems with blueberries. Pint for pint, blueberries may contain more antioxidants than any other fruit or vegetable. The most powerful health-promoting compounds in these little blueberries are anthocyanins, phytochemicals that belong to the flavonoid family -- which, in addition to combating the free-radical damage that leads to heart disease, may also boost brain power. In laboratory studies, aging animals fed a blueberry-rich diet for four months performed as well in memory tests as younger animals.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A answered
    Menopause is a natural part of life, not a disease or a health crisis. However, menopause may occur when many other changes are happening in your life. For instance, your children may be marrying or leaving home, your parents may be ill or dying or you may be wondering what you'll do when you retire. That's why it is probably more helpful to think of how your daily activities and lifestyle could affect your postmenopausal years.

    For instance, making sure that you exercise and eat right can make a real difference in how you feel and can even help prevent some of the long-term effects that are linked to estrogen deficiency (like osteoporosis).

    Physical changes do occur with menopause and with aging. But the changes that happen during this period can be minimized by healthy living and a sense of purpose in life. If your symptoms are severe enough to interfere with your life, consult your doctor to go over your options for treatment.
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    A answered
    Review the following questions about menopause so you're prepared to discuss this important health issue with your healthcare professional.
    • How many women in my age group do you treat? What percentage does this number represent of your total practice?
    • Are you comfortable treating perimenopausal and postmenopausal women? If not, can you refer me to a colleague who is?
    • Do you consider yourself up-to-date on treatment options for perimenopausal and postmenopausal health concerns, including hormone therapy and other medical therapies?
    • Can you arrange for evaluations for osteoporosis and heart disease? At what age should I have these evaluations?
    • If I am interested in alternative therapies, will you work with me to help identify those that might be helpful or refer me to someone who is a safe and knowledgeable practitioner?
    • I don't feel well in several different ways. Are my symptoms due to menopause or another condition?
    • How do I know if my on-again, off-again bleeding is perimenopause or another problem?
    • My sex drive is low. Can this be due to menopause or other factors in my life?
    • Will my incontinence stop after menopause, and what can I do about it now?
    • Can you discuss the most recent research about hormone therapy and its safety with me? How do the benefits and risks of hormone therapy apply to my personal health needs?