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Can menopause affect my bladder?

Menopause may affect the bladder in some women, because there is a decrease in hormone levels with menopause. This may lead to urinary incontinence, meaning your bladder may leak urine. Also, women are more prone to bladder infections after menopause, again due to hormone changes. Visit your physician if you are having these or other symptoms, there may be a treatment available.
Shelley C. Giebel, MD
OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)

You are more likely to have bladder infections after menopause. The opening to the bladder (the urethra) can become more susceptible to infection because the vaginal tissues surrounding become thinner. 

Intercourse may increase your risk for bladder infections because the vaginal tissues and urethra do not protect the bladder as effectively.  Sometimes physicians will give estrogen locally (in the vagina) to help build the tissues up to prevent infections and discomfort with intercourse.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.