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Am I eligible for Medicare if I’m still working?

Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Internal Medicine

You are eligible for Medicare if you’re still working. Up to three months before you turn 65, you can enroll in Medicare. If you have enough work credits under Social Security, you can apply for Medicare only. If you don’t have enough work credits under Social Security, you will need to file for Social Security and Medicare. 

And in fact, you are strongly, strongly encouraged to enroll in Medicare even if you have insurance through your job because you may lose some Social Security benefits if you do not apply within three months of your 65th birthday, and because Medicare Part A can still help pay some of the costs not covered by your group health insurance. Medicare Part B may not cover enough services on top of your group plan to justify paying the premium.

To learn more about enrolling in Medicare while you’re still working, visit www.socialsecurity.gov or call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.