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Should my child have an electronic health record (EHR)?

Electronic health records (EHRs) are here to stay, in part because the federal government wants everyone to have an EHR within ten years as a way to reduce medical errors, improve efficiency, and cut health care costs. So if your pediatrician already uses them -- roughly 20 percent do at the moment -- you might want to get started. Why? As more and more doctors and hospitals move to EHRs, you’ll soon be able to say, “Doctor, can you e-mail me my son’s lab results?” Not only will you have them quickly and precisely but you can then copy those results into your own electronic records.

From The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

 

 

The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents

More About this Book

The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents

What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do! "Moms and dads need expert guidelines, especially when it comes to their kids' health. This book reveals the inside strategies I use myself-I'm a parent, too!-to avoid critical, common blunders where it matters most: in the ER, pediatrics ward, all-night pharmacy, exam room, or any other medical hot spot for kids. These tips could save your child's life one day. Even tomorrow." -Dr. Jen Making health care decisions for your child can be overwhelming in this age of instant information. It's easy to feel like you know next to nothing or way too much. Either way, you may resort to guessing instead of making smart choices. That's why the nation's leading health care oversight group, The Joint Commission, joined forces with Dr. Jennifer Trachtenberg on this book: to help you make the right decisions, whether you're dealing with a checkup or a full-blown crisis. The Smart Parent's Guide will give you the information you need to manage the pediatric health care system. Dr. Jen understands the questions parents face—as a mom, she's faced them herself. She walks you through everything: from how to choose the best ER for kids (not adults) to when to give a kid medicine (or not to) to how pediatricians care for their own children (prepare to be surprised). Her goal is your goal: to protect the health of your children. There simply is nothing more important.

Your child's electronic health records are important. You can access your child’s medical records for a quick review of home care instructions or test results. A new medical provider can access his or her health history immediately and make better decisions about your child's treatment. The records also track immunizations and growth history.

You have access to your child's EHR, except when your child is the one who consents to care and your consent is not required, if your child receives care through the courts or with guidance from someone appointed by the courts, or if you agree that the child and medical provider have a confidential relationship.

Even so, it’s possible that a parent could still see a child’s EHR if restrictions are overruled by state or other applicable laws.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.