Lymphangiomas

Lymphangiomas

Lymphangiomas
Lymphangiomas are benign (noncancerous) tumors that typically appear on infants as soft growths on the skin. Because they are not painful and rarely cause complications, they are not typically treated. Surgery or laser therapy can cosmetically remove the cysts; about 15% disappear on their own.

Recently Answered

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    Lymphangiomas are usually diagnosed by the presence of a soft, sometimes discolored, mass on the skin. This mass is caused by a non-cancerous and usually painless tumor of the lymphatic system. A physical exam or tissue sample can confirm the common characteristics of lymphangiomas. An MRI can reveal the extent of the tumors' reach.

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    The most common symptom of lymphangiomas are the appearance of a soft, sometimes discolored, mass on the skin of the face or neck. The mass can range in color from a light pint or yellow to a dark red or even blue and is usually painless. Depending on the location of the mass, other symptoms can include difficulty breathing or eating.

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    The only risk factor for lymphangiomas that is within a parent's control is consumption of alcohol during pregnancy, but the relationship between these two factors is not clear. Lymphangiomas, or benign tumors of the lymphatic system, do not tend to run in families. They are associated with other congenital conditions, namely Klinefelter's Syndrome, Noonan's Syndrome, and Turner's Syndrome.

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    Lymphangiomas cannot be prevented. They develop in the womb as a child's lymphatic system fails to form properly. Fetal exposure to alcohol does seem to increase the risk of a child developing lymphangiomas, but is not the sole cause of the condition.

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    Unless there are complications, such as obstruction of the throat, managing lymphangiomas on a daily basis is generally not difficult. Pain is usually not associated with lymphangiomas, which are non-cancerous tumors of the lymphatic system. The chief symptom of the disorder is a soft, sometimes discolored growth on the skin, usually on the face or neck.

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    Some congenital illnesses increase the risk for a child developing lymphangiomas. The conditions identified as having a connection are Klinefelter's Syndrome, Noonan's Syndrome, or Turner's Syndrome. All three are associated with chromosomal abnormalities and cannot be prevented.

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    Lymphangiomas, or benign tumors of the lymphatic system, usually appear as soft growths on the skin by the age of one. Current recommendations are to refrain from surgery or laser treatment until at least the age of two, unless there are complications. Some lymphangiomas, by virtue of their location, can hinder eating or breathing. In those cases, immediate treatment may be necessary to ensure a child's proper development. In approximately 15 percent of cases, lymphangiomas disappear without treatment.

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    Lymphangiomatosis can create a multitude of complications. The condition, in which benign tumors grow in the pathways of the lymphatic system, can compromise the normal functioning of the body. All organs can be affected with the lungs and heart usually leading to the most serious complications.

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    Lymphangiomatosis can affect the body in numerous ways. In general, though, it interferes with the normal functioning of the body due to numerous benign tumors growing in the pathways of the lymphatic system. As these tumors enlarge and spread they can compromise vital organs, bone, or connective tissue.

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    Lymphangiomas, or tumors of the lymphatic system, can have complications, depending on their location. The face and neck are typically where lymphangiomas develop. In some cases, they interfere with breathing or eating. If the complications are serious enough they can even be fatal, although that rarely occurs.