Lupus Symptoms

Lupus Symptoms

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    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Here are some of the more common symptoms of lupus in both men and women:

    Joint swelling and pain
    Muscle weakness
    Extreme fatigue
    Unexplained fever
    Butterfly-shaped red rash across the bridge of the nose and cheeks
    Chest pain upon deep breathing
    Hair loss
    Purple fingers or toes when cold (Raynaud's phenomenon)
    Sun sensitivity
    Leg swelling
    Eye puffiness
    Mouth sores
    Swollen glands
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    If your child has symptoms of neonatal lupus (such as a skin rash), you should speak to your pediatrician right away. Most neonatal lupus symptoms go away after a few months, but rarely, babies may experience congenital heart block, a serious condition that interferes with heart function. In some cases, a pacemaker will be necessary to fix the heart.

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    Anti-malarial drugs are one type of treatment your doctor may prescribe to help manage your lupus. Lupus is an autoimmune disease, which means your immune system attacks your own body's own tissues. It is your body's version of "friendly fire."

    Anti-malarial medications prevent lupus from spreading to certain organs, such as the kidney and central nervous system (your brain and spinal cord) and may help reduce flares, or reoccurrences, of lupus by 50 percent.

    Anti-malarials can help you live longer with lupus, and you will often begin taking the drug when you are first diagnosed. These drugs are the key to controlling lupus long term, and you may have to take them for your entire life. Sometimes anti-malarials are called "lupus life insurance."

    Anti-malarial medications help to control lupus in several ways. These ways include:

    • Keeping your immune system in check without leaving your body open to infection
    • Protecting your skin against ultraviolet (UV) light
    • Improving skin lesions that do not respond to treatment with topical therapy (ointments)
  • 1 Answer
    A

    A group of white blood cells called lymphocytes plays a key role in the immune response. Lymphocytes include cells called B-cells and T-cells that help identify and fight infections in the body.

    In a healthy immune system, white blood cells gather at an infected or injured site in the body and produce substances that help fight off the infection. This process causes some inflammation and injury of healthy tissue, but usually the immune system can develop still more substances to control this inflammatory process.

    In a person with lupus, though, both B-cells and T-cells become overactive. In addition, lupus causes deficiencies in the regulatory T-cells, which are supposed to control the immune response system.

    The two main consequences of this altered white blood cell activity are:

    •The production of autoantibodies, which are antibodies that recognize and destroy the body's own cells. An antibody is a special protein the body produces to fight off infections and other invaders. In someone with lupus, however, the antibodies are produced at a very fast rate and actually work against the body.
    •Inflammation that can lead to long-term, irreversible scarring.

    The production of autoantibodies in people with lupus and other autoimmune diseases causes the immune system to target the body's own cells for destruction. Types of autoantibodies include:

    •Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) - About 98 percent of people with lupus possess antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which can attack critical parts of cells.
    •Antiphospholipid antibodies - These can also damage important components of cells and can also cause pregnancy complications, stroke, heart attacks, and other blood clots.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Rheumatology, answered on behalf of

    There is no cure for lupus, however goal is to achieve remission.  Because lupus is a chronic illness, symptoms will come and go; but in remission, symptoms should not be present.

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    You should speak to a doctor if you are beginning to feel the symptoms of lupus fog. A physician will be able to tell - through neurological examination - if you are experiencing cognitive dysfunction. Your doctor will also be able to tell if you have symptoms of something more serious, such as stroke or inflammation. In these instances, time is of the essence, so visiting a doctor as soon as possible is important. Your doctor may also be able to refer you to a cognitive therapist, who can help you with concentration and give you ways of coping when you experience episodes of fog.

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    If you are consistently tired, have joint pain, fever, or rash, you should talk to your doctor. The symptoms of lupus can be complicated and vary widely from person to person. Additionally, the severity of the symptoms can range from mild to severe and can be persistent for a stretch of time and then seemingly disappear. It is the variability of the symptoms that can make lupus hard to diagnose. Thorough and consistent communication about your symptoms and their duration may help a physician come to diagnosis sooner. The earlier a diagnosis is made, the less the likelihood that serious damage will be done by the disease.

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    Symptoms of lupus fog can occur at any time in an individual that has been diagnosed with lupus, but will often flare up during times of high stress. Most of the time, the affected individual will have generalized trouble verbalizing their ideas. Sometimes memory loss will occur along with the ability to perform everyday, routine tasks. Symptoms can occur intermittently, or be continuous for an extended period of time. Those experiencing foggy symptoms are usually completely aware it is occurring, which leads to high stress and frustration

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Rheumatology, answered on behalf of

    Roughly 5 new cases in a 100,000 are diagnosed each year.  One in a 1000 Caucasians live with lupus with four times as many in the African-American population.

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    For someone with lupus, a flare (an increase in symptom intensity) may have several warning signs. These include increased tiredness; joint, abdominal, and headache pain; rash; and fever. To prevent flares, stay out of the sun, increase the amount of rest you get, and pay attention to any actions or events that are likely to cause flares (e.g. staying in the sun too long) and avoid them.