Lung Disease and Respiratory System

Lung Disease and Respiratory System

Lung Disease and Respiratory System
Diseases, pollutants and genetics can affect your respiratory health. The simple cold - which is caused by more than 200 different viruses - inflames the upper respiratory tract, resulting in a cough, runny nose and sneezing. A more severe cough combined with mucus is a sign of bronchitis, where the membranes lining the bronchial tubes become inflamed. The inflammatory lung disease asthma affects more than 20 million people, making airways constrict when exposed to irritants like dust, pet dander and cigarette smoke. Pneumonia, another inflammation of the lungs, can occur because of a bacterial or viral infection. People suffering from cystic fibrosis, an inherited lung disease, frequently battle bacterial infections and airways clogged with thick and sticky mucus.

Recently Answered

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    Hyperventilation is breathing faster and deeper than what is considered normal for you. Doing this causes a decrease in carbon dioxide in your blood. Hyperventilation can cause symptoms such as:
    • lightheadedness
    • numbness or tingling in the hands and feet
    • fainting
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  • 1 Answer
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    When you hyperventilate, it is not because you are not getting enough oxygen. The problem is that your carbon dioxide is too low in relationship to the amount of oxygen you are taking in. (This answer provided for NATA by the University of Montana Athletic Training Education Program.)
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    People with chronic bronchitis most typically cough up mucus. The mucus is usually milky in color but may also be green or yellowish, particularly during periods of infection. Sometimes, however, when the lining of your bronchial tubes are particularly inflamed, they can become irritated enough that you cough up blood. While not uncommon, it is a more severe side effect of the condition which you should monitor closely, as coughing up blood is associated with lung cancer.

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    If you are experiencing a cough that is tinged with blood along with a sudden shortness of breath or chest pain, you are probably experiencing a complication of pulmonary embolism called lung infarction. Lung infarction occurs when an especially large obstruction is preventing your lungs from getting enough oxygen. When this happens for a prolonged time, lung tissue can die and cause permanent damage to the lungs. Seek medical help immediately (Call your Doctor or 911) if you cough up blood for any reason, as this can be a sign of a serious problem in your lungs.

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    Mountain sickness develops when the body cannot adjust to high elevations. At higher elevations the air pressure decreases, which means there is less oxygen in the air. The body needs time to adjust to lower oxygen levels.

    Individuals who climb or travel to altitudes higher than 8,000 feet above sea level at a rate that is faster than 1,000 feet per day are at risk of developing mountain sickness.

    Other factors may also influence a person's risk of developing mountain sickness. If the body is overworked within the first 24 hours of the climb, patients have an increased risk of developing the condition because the body requires more oxygen. Individuals who are dehydrated or hypothermic have an increased risk of developing the condition. Also, consuming alcohol or other sedatives increases the risk of the mountain sickness because these drugs slow breathing.

    Flying in a plane cannot cause mountain sickness because the oxygen level in the plane does not decrease.

      You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



      For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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      There are three things that climbers should keep in mind regarding altitude sickness:

      • If you begin experiencing symptoms of altitude sickness, even if no one else is feeling afflicted, you should assume that you are sick.
      • Remember to"climb high, sleep low." In other words, do not ascend to a new altitude to sleep if you are experiencing symptoms of altitude sickness.
      • If you not change altitudes and your symptoms are worse, descend as soon as possible.
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      There are not necessarily "cures" for pleural cavity disorders, but they tend to respond well to treatment. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms, remove air, fluid, or inflammation from the pleural cavity, and discover and treat the underlying cause of the disorder. Pain and difficulty breathing are leading symptoms for most of these disorders. Pain may be treated with pain relievers and breathing is usually restored once fluid and air are removed from the pleural cavity.

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      Anecdotal evidence suggests that dogs can become ill from the effects of high altitude, but there hasn't been much research on the topic. Like humans, at high altitudes some dogs stop eating, show discomfort and have no energy. If a dog is exhibiting symptoms, it is wise not to take the dog any higher. Also be sure it has plenty of water. If there is no improvement, it is a good idea to take the dog to a lower elevation.

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      Altitude sickness, also called mountain sickness, is an illness that occurs when the body is unable to adjust to high elevations. Symptoms of mountain sickness range from a mild headache and fatigue to a life-threatening build-up of fluid in the lungs or brain.

      Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is the mildest and most common type of mountain sickness. Mountain sickness typically develops when patients travel to elevations higher than 8,000 feet above sea level at a rate that is faster than 1,000 feet per day. Researchers estimate that nearly 50% of people who start at or near sea level and climb to 14,000 feet without scheduling rest time develop this condition.

      If patients with AMS continue to climb or travel to higher elevations despite their symptoms, their condition may progress to a more severe form, such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). This condition occurs when fluid builds up in the lungs, making breathing difficult. Additional treatments, such as supplemental oxygen, may help reduce symptoms. If left untreated, the condition can lead to respiratory failure and death. HAPE is the number one cause of death from mountain sickness.

      AMS may also develop into a severe condition called high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). This condition occurs when fluid builds up inside the brain, causing the brain to swell. As the brain swells, the person begins to feel confused and coordination becomes impaired. Some patients may experience permanent mental impairment and loss of coordination. The severity of these impairments varies among patients. If HACE is not treated, patients will develop a coma and die. More than 50% of HACE patients who develop a coma die.

      Some patients with AMS may develop high altitude retinal hemorrhage (HARH). This condition occurs when there is bleeding in the eye(s). Bleeding may not be visible to the patient. A common symptom is blurred vision. Left untreated, HARH may lead to permanent eye damage or vision loss.

      Patients with mountain sickness may develop HAPE, HACE, or HARH separately, or they may develop more than one of these conditions at the same time.

      You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



      For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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      A answered
      A hemothorax is a collection of blood in the space between the chest wall. In order to treat a hemothorax, a chest tube, inserted through the chest wall, is used to remove the blood and air in the pleural space. It remains in place for several days to re-expand the lung. When a hemothorax is severe, a thoracotomy may be needed to stop the bleeding.
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