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What happens when I don’t take in enough oxygen?

Pam Grout
Alternative & Complementary Medicine

If you only breathe about half of what's possible, you're probably settling for about half of what life has to offer. If you breathe with gusto and take in every last ounce of oxygen that's available to you, you undoubtedly approach life the same way.

People who don't get enough oxygen often fight depression. And from my experience, it's pretty difficult to stay down in the dumps once you fully oxygenate your body. Your breathing is a near-perfect representation of your willingness to dive into life.

Jumpstart Your Metabolism: How To Lose Weight By Changing The Way You Breathe

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Jumpstart Your Metabolism: How To Lose Weight By Changing The Way You Breathe

If you've tried every conceivable combination of diet and exercise and still can't shed those extra pounds, then perhaps you haven't discovered the hidden key to weight loss -- proper breathing. By...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.