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How does childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia affect the body?

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia affects the body by disrupting the normal balance of white and red blood cells in the body. Reduced levels of white blood cells, which normally defend the body from infection, can lead to higher chances of catching secondary diseases. Reduced levels of platelets, the cells that cause blood to clot, lead to more frequent bruises and nosebleeds. If the lymphoblasts spread to the brain, headaches and nausea can result, while cancerous cells spreading to the liver and spleen irritate the tissues there, causing them to swell. Finally, painful bones can result from the cancerous cells spreading into the bone marrow.

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