Childhood Vaccinations
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Childhood Vaccinations

Do your kids need a yearly flu shot or a whooping cough vaccine? Find out if you're up-to-date on vaccination facts with our quiz.

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Childhood Vaccinations
Childhood Vaccinations
Question 1 of 20 Correct

What diseases does the DTaP vaccine protect against?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The DTaP vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Children are supposed to have five doses of the DTaP. The CDC recommends giving it at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 15 to 18 months and 4 to 6 years.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 2 of 20 Correct

What is the risk of a serious reaction from the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Vaccines are very safe. The risk of a serious reaction from the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine is very small: Only one in a million children will suffer side effects, and most of those are very minor.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 3 of 20 Correct

True or false: Children who are not vaccinated are less likely to develop a disease because their natural immune systems will be stronger.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. For example, researchers in Colorado studied an increase in cases of whooping cough (pertussis). They found that children who had not been vaccinated against the disease were 23 percent more likely to get it than children who were vaccinated against it. Every type of medical treatment, including vaccines, carries a slight risk. But the risks of actually catching a disease and the side effects of that condition are usually greater.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 4 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vaccines cause autism.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Despite anecdotes and stories of seemingly healthy children experiencing dramatic and sudden behavior shifts after receiving vaccines, large-scale studies clearly demonstrate that vaccines are not responsible for autism. However, researchers suspect that in a small population of genetically susceptible children, vaccines might trigger autism, though it's likely the autism would have developed anyway.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 5 of 20 Correct

When should children first be vaccinated for measles?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that children have their first dose of measles vaccine between 12 and 15 months of age. Children should then have a measles vaccine booster just before starting school, or around four through six years of age.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 6 of 20 Correct

What diseases does the MMRV vaccine protect against?

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The correct answer is: The MMRV vaccine is a combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox). The pediatrician may suggest your child receive an MMRV vaccine around age 1. Sometimes the varicella vaccine is administered separately from the MMR vaccine.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: If your child does not contract the mumps before age 12, he will need a second dose of the vaccine.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Despite receiving the mumps vaccine, some children will still develop the disease. When they recover, those children will likely be immune to the disease for the rest of their lives. However, if your child does not contract mumps before age 12, he will need a second dose of the vaccine.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: If your child does not receive the varicella (chicken pox) vaccine before his first birthday, it is dangerous for her to receive it afterwards.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Most healthcare professionals recommend children receive the chicken pox vaccine after their first birthday, but it can be given any time. Anyone who has not had the varicella (chicken pox) vaccination or has never had a chicken pox infection should be vaccinated. However, the guidelines for administering the chicken pox vaccine are slightly different for older kids and adults.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 9 of 20 Correct

True or false: Children no longer need the polio vaccine.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Children should still receive the IPV (polio) vaccine in four doses. The CDC recommends they receive a dose at age 2 months, 4 months and 6 to 18 months, plus a booster between ages 4 and 6 years.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 10 of 20 Correct

At what age will your child need a DTaP booster?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Children will need a booster for the DTaP vaccine around age 11 or 12. This vaccine booster is called the Tdap (tetanus diphtheria and pertussis).

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 11 of 20 Correct

What is the average age of people infected with measles?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The average age of people infected with measles is 14. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the use of the MMR vaccine had largely eliminated measles from the United States as of 2000. However, as more parents are opting to not vaccine their children and international travel exposes more people to areas of the world where the disease has not been eradicated, measles is on the rise.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 12 of 20 Correct

True or false: If you're unsure whether your child has received a vaccination, it's safer not to vaccinate him than to give him a second treatment.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. If you're not sure your child received a vaccination, it's better that he or she receives a double dose of the vaccine than no vaccine at all. The risk of experiencing the minor side effects associated with a vaccine far outweighs the risks of contracting a disease.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 13 of 20 Correct

How often should a person get a tetanus booster shot?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Adults should get a tetanus/diphtheria vaccine booster every 10 years. If you are in an accident, your doctor may recommend you get a booster if it's been more than five years since your last booster.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 14 of 20 Correct

When should girls receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Doctors recommend girls between the ages of 11 and 12 begin receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer. The vaccine is given in three doses over a period of several months.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 15 of 20 Correct

Which of these vaccinations do you need annually?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: You need a flu vaccination every year. Strains of the flu virus change every year, so last year's vaccine won't protect you against this year's virus.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 16 of 20 Correct

True or false: Children under the age of 12 are too young to receive the flu vaccine.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. You should first give your child the flu vaccine after 6 months of age. Children will need a flu vaccine every year after that to protect against the virus. This is an especially important vaccine for children in schools or daycare centers.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 17 of 20 Correct

The meningitis vaccine is particularly important for which group of students?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Students who will be living in dormitories for the first time should receive the meningococcal meningitis vaccine. Meningococcal meningitis is a potentially fatal infection of the brain and spinal cord, and it is most easily transmitted in close-living quarters, such as school dorms.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: A vaccine does not eliminate the risk of getting a disease completely.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. An immunization does not completely prevent the disease in every case. However, if you do contract the disease, having the vaccine may significantly reduce its severity.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 19 of 20 Correct

Which of these vaccine side effects is not considered serious?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above are common side effects of vaccines, and they do not signal complications of the vaccines. Children may experience soreness at the injection site and a mild fever. They may also be slightly more cranky and sleep longer than usual for a day or two after receiving the vaccine.

Childhood Vaccinations
Question 20 of 20 Correct

True or false: Your county's health department can require you to vaccine your children.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Ultimately, the decision to vaccinate your children or not is yours. Your healthcare providers and doctors can supply you with information and assistance to help you make the decision, but if you decide not to vaccinate your child or to follow an alternative schedule for administering vaccines, that is your decision. Talk with your pediatrician about your questions and concerns regarding vaccines.

Childhood Vaccinations
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