Children's Health
Advertisement
Advertisement

Childhood Obesity

The number of overweight and obese children in America grows every year. Test your knowledge of childhood obesity facts and stats.

Begin Quiz
Childhood Obesity
Childhood Obesity
Question 1 of 20 Correct

What percentage of American children and adolescents are overweight or obese?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: More than one third of American children and adolescents are overweight or obese. Since 1980, childhood obesity has more than tripled in the United States.

Childhood Obesity
Question 2 of 20 Correct

What causes childhood obesity?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Overweight and obesity are the result of a caloric imbalance. In other words, the number of calories a child consumes is greater than the number of calories he burns. This caloric imbalance can be the result of several different factors.

Childhood Obesity
Question 3 of 20 Correct

Which of these factors influence a caloric imbalance?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: A caloric imbalance can be caused by lack of physical activity, genetic factors, lifestyle factors, poor diet or nutritional habits.

Childhood Obesity
Question 4 of 20 Correct

Childhood obesity can cause which of these conditions?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Childhood obesity is a serious medical condition that can lead to health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, sleep apnea and cancer as the child grows older.

Childhood Obesity
Question 5 of 20 Correct

Which measurement is recommended by the CDC for determining if a child is overweight or obese?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The body mass index, or BMI, is used to determine if a child is overweight or obese. Children with a BMI in the 95th percentile are obese; children with a BMI in the 85th percentile or greater are overweight. However, the measure is only accurate in children ages 2 and up.

Childhood Obesity
Question 6 of 20 Correct

True or false: Though children who are overweight or obese are at risk for developing heart disease, the risk drops significantly for both boys and girls if they lose weight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Children with weight issues can develop heart disease before they're even 20. However, gender plays a role in the risk. If girls lose weight, their hearts seem to reverse the damage done by obesity, but in boys, the danger remains.

Childhood Obesity
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: Overweight or obese children are more likely to have memory problems than children with a normal weight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Overweight and obese children are more likely to have memory and learning problems. A new study shows that obese children with metabolic syndrome may have brain complications that lead to poorer performance in school.

Childhood Obesity
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: Childhood obesity only impacts a child physically.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. The damage done by childhood obesity extends past the physical repercussions. Children who are overweight or obese suffer psychological consequences as well. These kids have a harder time in school, interacting with peers and keeping up with other kids. They are more likely to get bullied and teased, they have lower self-esteem and many will deal with negative stereotypes.

Childhood Obesity
Question 9 of 20 Correct

True or false: Children and adolescents who are overweight or obese are more likely to attempt suicide.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Being overweight -- or even thinking they are overweight -- makes many teens more apt to attempt suicide.

Childhood Obesity
Question 10 of 20 Correct

Which of the following is most influential towards children's eating habits?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Children pick up their eating habits the same place they get their genes: their family. Children mimic what they see their parents and siblings do, so getting healthy starts at home.

Childhood Obesity
Question 11 of 20 Correct

If both parents are obese, what's the chance their kids will be, too?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: If both parents are obese, there's an 80 percent chance their kids will be, too.

Childhood Obesity
Question 12 of 20 Correct

True or false: Babies who are breastfed are at an increased risk of becoming obese or overweight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Breastfeeding seems to have a protective effect against obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a baby's risk of becoming an overweight child goes down with each month of breastfeeding.

Childhood Obesity
Question 13 of 20 Correct

Which is the most important meal for children?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Children who eat breakfast have a lower risk of obesity. They also perform better at school than non-breakfast eaters.

Childhood Obesity
Question 14 of 20 Correct

True or false: Dieting is the best way to help children lose weight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. A combination of an improved diet and more exercise will help children lose weight and maintain the weight loss. Focusing on one element over the other sets children up for more weight struggles as they get older.

Childhood Obesity
Question 15 of 20 Correct

What percentage of students in grades 9 through 12 meet the recommendation that adolescents should have at least 60 minutes of aerobic physical activity each day?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends that children as young as six years old get 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Unfortunately, only 18 percent of students meet that recommendation. Physical activity can help prevent obesity.

Childhood Obesity
Question 16 of 20 Correct

What is the maximum number of hours health experts recommend children watch television in a day?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Medical experts recommend children watch television or use entertainment media (including video games) for no more than two hours each day. Most children average more than seven hours of entertainment media in a day. A combination of factors -- including not being physically active and eating high-fat, high-calorie food -- contribute to childhood obesity.

Childhood Obesity
Question 17 of 20 Correct

Which of these is the best drink option for children?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Of the above options, water is the best choice. Although 100 percent fruit juice may contain some vitamins, it can also have as many calories and grams of sugar as a soda. In addition to water, make sure your child drinks low-fat or fat-free milk to get the fluid and nutrients his growing body needs.

Childhood Obesity
Question 18 of 20 Correct

What percentage of his meal should you require your child to eat at each meal?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Do not make your child finish an entire meal. If he says he is full, let him stop. Making a child eat an entire meal teaches him to overeat, which increases the amount of calories he takes in each day.

Childhood Obesity
Question 19 of 20 Correct

True or false: As a reward for losing weight or being more physically active, you should reward your child with a sweet or other favorite food.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Rewarding your child with food sends the wrong message. Instead of food, reward your child with more play time or a new book or game.

Childhood Obesity
Question 20 of 20 Correct

Consuming 100 fewer calories every day will result in a weight loss of how many pounds in a year?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Cutting out just 100 calories each day adds up to a 10-pound weight loss in a year. Encourage your child to cut back on high-calorie foods like chips, cookies and soda and instead eat pretzels, fruit or granola. Little savings add up to big losses.

Childhood Obesity
Congratulations!

You got out of 20 correct. You're a health wiz!

Childhood Obesity
Good try!

You got out of 20 correct. Learn more about Children's Health to improve your score.

Childhood Obesity
Better luck next time!

You got out of 20 correct. Learn more about Children's Health to improve your score.