Kidney Transplant

Kidney Transplant

One of the most common transplant procedures in the United States, kidney transplantation is a treatment option for those with advanced and permanent kidney failure. The first kidney transplant was performed in the 1950s, and since then doctors have learn much about minimizing the side effects of medications and how to prevent the body from rejecting the new organ. Healthy kidneys remove wastes and excess fluids from blood, which balances out the chemicals in the blood and keep it clean. When the kidneys fail, the body is unable to remove the harmful wastes and they could damage the body. Kidney transplantation is not for everyone. Certain conditions make the procedure too dangerous or unlikely to be successful.

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    Kidney transplant rejection is treated with medication through an intravenous (IV) line or by mouth, depending on how strong the rejection is. Early detection is very important and also why the kidney recipient must not miss any medical appointments. The transplant team can treat and usually reverse rejection when treated early. 
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    The patient's native kidneys are usually left in place, unless they have a disease such as polycystic kidney disease and experience symptoms such as pain, infection, or gastrointestinal symptoms.

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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Single-site surgery elevates general laparoscopy to an approach that only uses one 20-25 millimeter (mm) incision. This method usually requires a specialized port that allows for the camera and several instruments to be inserted from the same site. Benefits of this method include a single surgical site and less postoperative pain, with some people able to return to their daily lives sooner. There is a better cosmetic result as well.
     
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    What types of medication are needed after a kidney transplant?
    After you have a kidney transplant, you'll most likely take two medications to help with recovery and function. Francis Wright, MD, of Methodist Hospital explains more about the types of medications in this video. 
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of
    What is Riverside Community Hospital's Key Criteria for success When It Comes to transplants surgery?
    Key criteria for success after kidney transplant include close monitoring of patients after surgery. In this video, Ronald Martin, RN, with the transplant services team at Riverside Community Hospital, says that this support extends for years.
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    How is the quality of life of a kidney transplant recipient?
    The quality of life of those patients who receive a kidney transplant is excellent. The majority of recipients go back to living normal lives. Learn more from Johns Hopkins Medicine about a kidney transplant.
     
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of
    What kind of support is available after surgery for a kidney transplant?
    After surgery for kidney transplant, support includes close following by the transplant services team. In this video, Ronald Martin, RN, with the transplant services team at Riverside Community Hospital, says that follow-up may continue for years.
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    A Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of
    Kidney transplantee detox
    A kidney transplant can cause significant trauma to the body, and if you go on a detox after this major procedure, you may experience harmful effects. In this video, Dr. Oz guest Dr. Linda Lee explains why you should avoid an extreme detox if you've had a kidney transplant.
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    If you have a kidney transplant and are considering pregnancy, you should discuss it carefully with your transplant team and your kidney doctor. Your doctor may want you to switch to a different anti-rejection medicine.

    Many anti-rejection medicines taken following a kidney transplant are generally safe for a pregnant woman and the fetus. However, there are some types that can affect pregnancy and the baby. These types should be avoided during pregnancy, and stopped at least six weeks (or more) before becoming pregnant. Your doctor will see you regularly after you've stopped, and let you know when it's safe to attempt pregnancy.
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    As with most serious surgeries, you will need someone to pick you up and take you home when the transplant team discharges you from the hospital. While at home, you should follow these guidelines:

    •          Driving should be avoided for two weeks while on pain medication

    •          No heavy lifting (10 lbs) for six weeks

    •          No exercising for six weeks and until cleared by your urologist

    •          No tub baths for six weeks, but showering permitted

    •          Walking is encouraged

    •          Prolonged sitting or lying should be avoided

    •          Take pain medication as prescribed

    •          Maintain a proper diet

    •          Drink plenty of water and fluids

    •          Follow a no-added salt diet

    •          Avoid high protein diets and low carbohydrate diets

     Notify your doctor or transplant coordinator if you experience:

    •          Fever

    •          Wound drainage or wound opening

    •          Red, swollen incision

    •          Pain that is a change from incision pain

    •          Nausea and/or vomiting

    •          Change in urination, including decreased volume, inability to void, pain, urgency or frequency

    For most recipients, recovery time at home is about four to six weeks. Anti-rejection medication will also need to be taken for the rest of your life to prevent your body from recognizing the donated kidney as foreign and attacking it.

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