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When are intermediate- and long-acting insulins usually taken?

A single shot of insulin can sometimes be enough to bring the blood glucose into the target range. Usually, a long-acting insulin or intermediate-acting insulin is given at bedtime or in the morning. The insulin is used to provide the basal level of insulin. Long-acting insulins provide a steady level of insulin throughout the day and night. Taking intermediate-acting insulin at bedtime helps lower your fasting glucose level. Taking intermediate-acting insulin in the morning provides some coverage for the food you eat as well as basal insulin.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.