Allergies in Children

Allergies in Children

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    If you think that your child may have allergies, you should schedule an appointment with your child's physician. Discuss the symptoms your child is experiencing, any further evaluation that may be required to confirm the diagnosis, and treatment options. 
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    In the event of allergy or enlarged lymph tissue from infection, the Eustachian tube will be closed for long periods of time, creating a vacuum in the middle ear, during which fluid can accumulate, followed by one of those painful ear infections. Chronic ear infections can cause hearing loss. Sometimes a tube has to be placed in the eardrum to substitute for the blocked Eustachian tube. If your child is prone to ear infection, allergy treatment is not merely useful but necessary.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Most moderate to severe allergic or asthmatic children need to be supervised to take their medication at least twice daily. That's at least two times a day the parental figure's attention is drawn away from the well children. How do you reduce the feelings of neglect on the part of the well children?

    Get them to act as assistant caregivers and help the parent give the medication. When you take the medication down from its secure location, give it to your assistant to carry. Secure storage is crucial - you don't want anyone to play doctor when you're not around.

    Explain each step as your physician taught it to you. Repeat the names of the medications and delivery devices. Take the mystery out of medication and replace it with fun and understanding.

    Reinforce the message - and take the attraction out of all the attention that comes from being sick - by playing a game of role reversal. The sick child can act out becoming the assistant caregiver for the well child.

    Above all, make sure that all children get time during which they are your sole focus.
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    A myriad of particles/substances can act as allergens and trigger children's allergy symptoms. Common indoor allergens include dust mite, cockroach, pet dander and some molds, while outdoor allergens include trees, grass, weed pollen and other molds. Patients who are allergic to indoor allergens tend to be symptomatic year-round, while those who are allergic to pollens develop symptoms almost exclusively during the pollen season.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Allergy treatment in children may vary for a few reasons. For example, treating a child between the ages of 2 and 3 is different from treating a child between 3 and 4. Why? Because one is in that very real stage known as the "terrible twos," when children say no to everything and begin to test their debating skills, whereas by the time four rolls around, they are more likely to have reached an age of (comparative) reason. Up to the time of preadolescence, children seem to attain some degree of ease with their treatment. They become knowledgeable and even cooperative, although boys and girls are somewhat different. They remain reasonable until they approach adolescence, when a whole new set of dynamics kick in, and the gender differences become more pronounced.
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    Undiagnosed or uncontrolled asthma can cause many problems for young athletes. While coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath are all symptoms of a cold, parents should talk to their pediatrician if coughing and wheezing occurs during exercise. Luckily, the treatments for asthma is very advanced and should help kids play sports or exercise comfortably.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Watery eyes, runny nose, sneezing, itching, hives, eczema, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, vomiting are symptoms of allergic reactions in children.  However, tingling sensation in the mouth, swelling of the tongue and the throat, difficulty breathing, drop in blood pressure, loss of consciousness, and even death can occur with severe reactions. 
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    MCS (multiple chemical sensitivity) seems to be a problem for the middle-aged, not for children. People are more likely to encounter it when they change jobs or move to a new workplace than their kids are. Still, whether the worry is chemicals or such proven allergens as molds and mouse droppings, there is always a chance that they will activate their children's plain old allergies in the event they renovate their homes, or if a child's school is going to be renovated.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    The conventional wisdom is that the child will probably outgrow one allergy related problem or another. They might, but chances are that each condition they outgrow will be followed by another down the road -- accompanied by the psychological problems that come from having spent their childhood sneezing, wheezing, and scratching.
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    Different skin allergies may affect children and adults differently. Many skin allergy conditions develop during early childhood, and symptoms usually improve or go away completely by adulthood. One such condition is atopic dermatitis, which is a skin disorder that may be triggered by allergies and is quite common in children but usually disappears by the age of 25. Other skin allergies are more common in adults or can last a lifetime. For example, allergic contact dermatitis, which happens when a substance that touches the skin triggers an allergic reaction, is more common in adults.