Healthy Holidays

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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    How Can I Avoid Injuries on July 4th?
    Don’t let holiday festivities turn into a nightmare trip to the emergency room. In this video, emergency medicine physician, David Feldman, MD, of Good Samaritan Hospital, offers tips for celebrating Independence Day safely. 
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    Make Halloween a fun occasion with games, goofy decorations, and light-hearted movies.  You might gather the neighborhood children together for a Halloween Olympics at a park.  Have the kids dress up in funny costumes that allow free mobility and visibility and compete in tug of war, relay races and more.  You may even decide to have a Halloween Candy Hunt, similar to the Easter variety.  Avoid spooky decorations and loud, creepy music. 
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    A , Marriage & Family Therapy, answered
    You are working hard to minimize your intake of sugar and processed foods, but you don't want your children to miss out on the fun of Halloween and dressing up and trick or treating. Maybe you want to minimize the sugar and processed food your children eat and teach them healthy eating habits. What are you going to do with all that Halloween candy?!?

    You could simply throw it out, but you risk complaints from the kids. Plus, what are you teaching them other than denying them indulgence? You could hide it in that cabinet above the refrigerator, hoping the kids (and you) forget about it -- but will that work?

    Don't surrender to sugar intoxication. Halloween is just the start of the holiday season, where temptation after temptation is calling for you to break your food plan and overindulge. Start the holiday season on the right foot and find a creative way to get rid of the candy.
    • Reverse Trick or Treating -- This suggestion was inspired by another Indianapolis therapist. Get at least one more use out of that costume; let your children dress up again after school and deliver candy to others -- all treats, no tricks. Your children will learn the joy of giving to others and you get rid of the candy. Consider treating teachers, caregivers, your pediatrician, home-bound neighbors, or empty-nesting family members.
    • Candy Currency -- Turn the candy into a currency that your kids can use to purchase privileges or pay fines for breaking the rules. Privileges for purchase will have to offer more pleasure than the candy for this to work. To truly teach the value of quality food over junk food, pick up some Scarrots and let them be worth ten times more than any single serving of processed candy.
    • Care Packages -- A local dentist is collecting candy to save kids' teeth and is sending it to soldiers serving overseas. This is another way to teach your children the joy of giving to others. Pack up all the candy to send to soldiers, orphans, or far away relatives.
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    A , Healthcare, answered

    Halloween can be a difficult time for a diabetic. Eating a lot of candy and other sweets is out, so there’s a tendency for concerned parents to want to keep their children from trick-or-treating. The result is that they feel labeled as a kid with a disease.

    When I was a kid, my mom was concerned that I would feel ostracized during Halloween. She knew I couldn’t be wolfing down candy, but she didn’t want me to sit home while all my friends were out trick-or-treating. So she came up with a wonderful way for me to enjoy Halloween. You can do the same thing I did:

    Every Halloween, we’d dress up in our Power Ranger or Batman costumes and go out trick-or-treating in our Tallahassee neighborhood. At the end of the day, my buddies would give me whatever candy they didn’t want. I would take this massive pile of candy -- what I had collected and what my friends had given me -- and I would sell it back to my mom. She paid twenty- five cents for chocolate and ten cents for anything else. That was her idea and it worked.

    Halloween became one of my favorite days of the year: we’d spend a lot of time, and my mom knew she didn’t have to worry about my feeling left out or stigmatized. And I made a profit! So, for this Halloween, make a sweet deal with your child!

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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Here are some tips to help you stay healthy on Halloween:

    1. It's a Holiday.
    • Trick: Despite what the stores say, Halloween is just 1 day -- and Halloween shouldn't start candy/treat week, or season.
    • Treat: If you make it one day you can treat yourself -- enjoy your favorite candy and/or baked goods.
    2. "Better For You" Sugar
    • Trick: "Sugar-free" but made with artificial sweeteners; often time they don't even taste as good. Or what about when it says "No Sugar Added" (there's already enough sugar in there, they didn't need to add more) or "Naturally Fat-Free" (hint hint, there never was any fat in Twizzlers -- where this label comes from -- but there's also no Twizzler tree in Nature -- nothing natural about it -- and it has enough sugar to make a lot of fat in the body if we eat it beyond our 1 day holiday).
    • Treat: Naturally sweet (organic fruit), organic fruit-juice sweetened, organic sugar.
    3. What's the Main Activity?
    • Trick: Eating candy? Driving around to houses?
    • Treat: Walk, bike, roller blade, games for trick-or-treating and parties.
    4. What's Sweeter than Candy?
    • Trick: Using candy as a reward for doing chores, good behavior, and good grades -- now there's a huge negative health trade-off!
    • Treat: A game or toy they want (they can give you candy for it on Halloween night), you can also get them a new toothbrush (radius.com) and use this as a time to discuss how important teeth brushing is on holidays as well as regular days.
    5. All the Colors of the Rainbow Provide Health?
    • Trick: Candies made from artificial dyes? This is not what I mean when I say that nature gave us all our health needs with all the different colors. Our bodies don't know what to do with Blue #7 but they know what a blueberry provides.
    • Treat: Dyes made from vegetables and fruit.
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    A answered
    Wearing costume contact lenses presents dangers that consumers should know about. Despite the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulating them, costume contact lenses are still found at costume shops, gas stations, over the internet, and at corner stores and flea markets.

    Costume contact lenses, because they have the pigment deposited in them, are different from the normal clear contact lenses that most people use on a daily basis. The pigment is deposited at different levels and sometimes is deposited superficially, meaning that there could be a little rough spot on the inside of the lens that could scratch the eye. Also, chemicals like chlorine and iron can leach out of the lens, which also can be toxic to the eye. Because of the addition of the color, there's less permeability of oxygen for these lenses, and also, the lenses tend to be a little more rigid, both of which put the eye at increased risk.
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    To make trick-or-treating safe for your child, follow these Halloween safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics:
    • Use non-toxic makeup instead of masks.
    • Choose bright, reflective costumes.
    • Add reflective tape to treat bags.
    • Give kids glow sticks or flashlights for better visibility.
    • Always use the sidewalk and crosswalks.
    • Never cross the street between parked cars or in the middle of the block.
    • Never walk alone. An adult should always accompany kids under 12. Older kids should stay in groups and stick to a well-lit, pre-planned route.
    This content originally appeared online at Baptist Health South Florida. https://baptisthealth.net/baptist-health-news/tips-safe-healthy-halloween/?cat=education
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    The pediatricians at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA offer parents the following simple safety tips for choosing Halloween costumes:

    Consider choosing a light-colored costume or add glow-in-the-dark tape to the front and back of the outfit so your kids can be easily seen by others and by cars. Don’t buy a costume unless it’s labeled “flame-retardant.” Make sure wigs and beards don’t cover your child’s eyes, nose or mouth, since this may make it difficult to see and breathe. Avoid oversized and high-heeled shoes that could cause children to trip, and avoid long or baggy skirts, pants or shirtsleeves that could catch onto something and result in a fall.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Lisa Lillien - What are healthy alternatives to Halloween candy?

    Some candy types are better than others in terms of fat content. In this video, Hungry Girl author Lisa Lillien tells what they are and what you should really avoid.


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    The following are 10 tips that parents should remember:
    • Always accompany younger children for trick-or-treating.
    • If they are old enough to trick-or-treat by themselves, have your children go in groups—even if only on your block or in your building.
    • If your children is going on dark streets, have them take a flashlight. If they are going in apartment buildings, accompany them inside.
    • Do not let your children enter a stranger's home or apartment. Have them ask for the treats while waiting outside the door.
    • If your children are trick-or-treating at nighttime, make sure their costume is bright in color, or have them wear reflectors.
    • If they are wearing masks, make sure the eye holes are the right size and in the right place so that vision is not blocked.
    • Instruct your children on proper street-crossing safety.
    • Make sure costumes are made of non-flammable material and are short enough so that they don't trip.
    • Do not let them eat any candy before they get home and you examine it.
    • Make sure they throw away any unwrapped foods.
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