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Lowering Cholesterol Naturally with a PB&J

Lowering Cholesterol Naturally with a PB&J

Next time you're yearning for something rich and creamy, here's an almost guilt-free indulgence your ticker will love: peanut butter.

Grab a spoonful. Not only will you be enjoying rich and satisfying taste, but also you could be helping to lower both your bad cholesterol and your risk of heart disease.

Spread a little joy
In one long-term study, women with type 2 diabetes enjoyed an almost 45 percent lower risk for cardiovascular disease and heart attack when they gave in and ate at least five servings of peanut butter and mixed nuts each week. This was compared with women who noshed less often on nutty snacks. And those five weekly 1-ounce helpings seemed to knock down the women's total and LDL cholesterol levels, too.

Nuts for all hearts
Nutrients in peanuts and nuts may help hearts in a couple of ways. They may minimize inflammation—something your heart really could do without—and they may help your body use insulin better. Because of this, women with type 2 diabetes probably aren't the only ones who can benefit from eating nuts and peanut butter. In fact, research suggests that nuts may lower heart disease risk for everyone—regardless of gender, age, ethnicity or health status. Try these other heart-healthy changes, too:

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