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What are the stages of chronic hypertension for adults?

Dr. Jeanne Morrison, PhD
Family Practitioner
Here are the stages of chronic hypertension:
In stage 1 hypertension, your blood pressure measurement reads between 140 and 159 mm Hg. People in this category are recommended to make lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, and eating a healthier diet. If you have stage 1 hypertension, your doctor will likely have you come back for follow-up within a few months to see if your hypertension has improved or worsened.

Stage 2 hypertension is the most serious form of hypertension. People with this level of hypertension have a blood pressure measurement of 160/100 mm Hg or higher. People in this category will likely be prescribed medication as well as strongly encouraged to make lifestyle changes. The higher the numbers, the more urgent it is that you start treatment immediately.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.