Advertisement

How do medications treat secondary high blood pressure?

Secondary high blood pressure is generally treated using a procedure to correct the underlying cause. In some cases however it may also be necessary to use medication. There are a whole group of drugs used to treat high blood pressure called antihypertensives. Your doctor will need to consider several factors before prescribing one, including your age, race and how high your blood pressure is because there are several types of antihypertensives and they all work differently. Diuretics and direct vasodilators can be used to dilate blood vessels. Similarly, angiotensin II receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers all dilate arterioles through different processes. Two other antihypertensives, adrenergic blockers and centrally acting alpha-agonists, work by suppressing the sympathetic division of your nervous system, which helps controls blood pressure along with your kidneys. It isn't uncommon for your doctor to prescribe a combination of these medications in order to get the best results and it's also likely that they will have you take aspirin as well.

Continue Learning about High Blood Pressure Treatment

Treat Your High Blood Pressure, Boost Your Heart
Treat Your High Blood Pressure, Boost Your Heart
When confronting a health problem, sometimes medications or other treatment strategies work wonders—and sometimes the results are less dramatic. One t...
Read More
What is Prestalia?
RealAgeRealAge
Prestalia is a combination of two drugs, perindopril and amlodipine, meant to control high blood pre...
More Answers
What medications can reduce exercise-induced high blood pressure?
RealAgeRealAge
Blood pressure can increase when you exercise. Until now, nobody knew how to prevent that. New r...
More Answers
Can Beet Juice Help Lower My Blood Pressure?
Can Beet Juice Help Lower My Blood Pressure?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.