Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements
Herbal supplements are dietary supplements derived from nature. Herbal plants or parts of a plant are broken down and used for their scent, flavor and therapeutic benefits. When taken as a supplement, they can deliver strong benefits, however, herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can have dangerous side effects. They act like drugs once in your system and can affect metabolism, circulation and excretion of other substances in your body. It is important to discuss with your doctor if you are on prescription medications, are breastfeeding or have chronic illnesses and want to add herbal supplements to your health regimen.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Cat's Claw

    One of the health benefits of cat's claw is that it is used to treat some forms of reproductive cancer.

    Watch as Chris Kilham and Dr. Oz discuss the other health benefits of cat's claw from Peru in this video.


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    Which foods are rich sources of copper?
    Foods that are rich sources of copper include oysters, sesame seeds, dark chocolate, and cashew nuts. In this video, I discuss these copper-rich foods, and the benefits of copper for overall health and vitality.
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    Home Remedies for Bruises
    The enzyme papain, which is found in papaya, can reduce swelling and may help a bruise to heal. Watch as Dr. Oz talks about papain and bruises.



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    A , Dermatology, answered
    What are the anti-aging benefits of copper?
    Copper plays a vital role in collagen production, which keeps our skin looking young and firm. In this video, dermatologist Jeannette Graf, MD, discusses the anti-aging benefits of copper for the skin, and how you can find it in beauty products.
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    Home Remedies for Bruises
    Papain is an enzyme found in papaya that can be helpful for reducing swelling and treating injuries such as bruises. Watch Dr. Oz talk about treatments for bruises.



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    A Oncology Nursing, answered on behalf of
    All medications that you are taking should be discussed with your doctor. Many are safe to continue during treatment, but this could vary depending on the type of chemotherapy you are receiving.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Supplements of borage oil may offer benefits for some people, but they do carry risks and warnings. Borage oil contains a type of omega-6 fatty acid called gamma-linolenic acid, or GLA, which has anti-inflammatory properties. Some studies show it may help relieve symptoms in people with rheumatoid arthritis, eczema and possibly other conditions.

    However, some borage oil supplements contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids that can harm the liver. There is also some evidence that the GLA in borage oil and other supplements may cause seizures in some people, so they should be avoided by anyone with a seizure disorder. Do not take borage oil if you're pregnant, because it may harm your fetus and/or bring on premature labor.

    Men at risk for prostate cancer should avoid borage oil, because some studies show omega-6 fatty acids may promote the growth of prostate tumor cells. Omega-6 supplements may interact with certain other medications including blood thinners, some antibiotics, chemotherapy medications and drugs that suppress the immune system. Don't take omega-6 if you're on any of these medications. As with all supplements, the best advice is to consult your doctor before taking borage supplements.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana and Armoracia lapathifolia) is a large, long, tapered root with thin, light brown skin, white flesh, and spiky green leaves. Horseradish is a member of the cabbage family and is related to mustard and radish, as well as kale, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts.

    Although the leaves can be used in salads, horseradish is valued primarily for its root's pungent bite. This effect, which develops only when the root is broken and wetted, is the result of the reaction that occurs when a number of chemicals that the plant stores separately are allowed to mix. These chemicals - an enzyme, myrosinase, and a number of isothiocyanate compounds, including two glucosinolates, sinigrin and 2-phenylethylglucosinolate, react and form the mustard-like oils that enable horseradish to provide such robust enhancement of vegetables, fish, and meat.

    The horseradish root is harvested in the spring and fall and sold in 1,200-pound pallets to processors, who use it to make one of the world's most popular condiments, both singly and as an ingredient in numerous sauces and dressings. Regardless of the product to be made, horseradish is first grated, and then mixed with distilled vinegar, which stops the reaction that forms its isothiocyanates, stabilizing the oils and maintaining their hot, peppery edge. Other spices or ingredients may also be added, but horseradish and vinegar are the sine qua non of all prepared horseradish.

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    Encyclopedia of Healing Foods
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Borage supplements may be labeled as borage oil, borage seed oil or borago officinalis. Borage oil also might be one ingredient in a supplement labeled gamma-linolenic acid, or GLA. GLA is an omega-6 fatty acid, found mostly in plant foods. It's considered essential to maintaining the health of bones and the reproductive system, regulating metabolism and stimulating skin and hair growth.

    Some studies suggest that borage oil may be helpful in relieving symptoms in people who have rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, but more research is needed. Consult your doctor before taking borage supplements, or any dietary supplement.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Borage supplements contain borage oil from the seeds of the borage plant. Those seeds and the oil that comes from them contain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid. Some research indicates that GLA can reduce joint pain, stiffness and tenderness in people with rheumatoid arthritis. GLA is also being studied to determine if it can reduce airway swelling in people who have asthma.