Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements
Herbal supplements are dietary supplements derived from nature. Herbal plants or parts of a plant are broken down and used for their scent, flavor and therapeutic benefits. When taken as a supplement, they can deliver strong benefits, however, herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can have dangerous side effects. They act like drugs once in your system and can affect metabolism, circulation and excretion of other substances in your body. It is important to discuss with your doctor if you are on prescription medications, are breastfeeding or have chronic illnesses and want to add herbal supplements to your health regimen.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    What are Rhodiola supplements?
    Rhodiola is ideal for those who get tired/depressed when they are stressed out; it has a gentle stimulating effect on the nervous system and our mood. Watch acupuncturist and herbalist Mary Sabo explain the benefits of rhodiola, and how to take it. 
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Bitter orange is a weight loss supplement. When the FDA banned the herbal stimulant ephedra, bitter orange was put into various "weight-loss" products. However, there are many concerns that it may not be any safer than ephedra. In fact, Consumer Reports listed it in an article on dangerous alternative medicines and said it was associated with "fainting, heart-rhythm disorders, heart attack, stroke, and death."
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Hunted in Siberia and extracted from chips, Rhodiola rosea anecdotally promotes energy, stamina, and sexual function and libido. Stuff chips into a pint container, and fill with vodka. Then try a tablespoon a night (if beet red, it will have 200 to 600 milligrams of the extract). How good is the data? Not solid enough to recommend to anyone, but a little alcohol every night keeps your cardiovascular system younger even if not in red wine.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    If you're like many Americans today -- overscheduled and overworked -- you may be suffering from excess stress. Rhodiola rosea, a plant that grows in cold regions such as Siberia, is known as an "adaptogen," an herb that increases the body's resistance to stress by reducing levels of cortisol. You can take it in pill form or try Dr. Oz's stress shot: Add Rhodiola rosea "chips" to vodka and steep for at least 24 hours until it turns pink. Drink a stress shot but make sure to have just one. Available online and at health food stores in supplement form or as "chips" for $15-$20.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Dr. Tasneem Bhatia - What is Phosphatidylserine?

    Integrative Medicine Specialist Dr. Tasneem Bhatia explains what phosphatidylserine is and why it's healthy for you. Watch Dr. Bhatia's video for tips and information on integrative medicine solutions.


  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you want to. About 70 percent of our cell membranes are made from this, and as we age, the level of phosphatidylserine drops, and the membranes become brittle. This supplement seems to strengthen cell membranes and the phospholipid sheathing around nerves, protecting the cables that transfer information from shorting out. Since risks are few, taking 200 milligrams daily is reasonable.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    It may stink like rotten eggs, but sulfur is very important maintaining joint tissue and keeping it strong. Particularly cartilage.

    Perhaps this is why MSM - short for methylsulfonylmethane - may provide possible benefits in treating joint problems, including osteoarthritis, tendinitis and sports injuries, as well as inflammation reduction. Because sulfur is a large component of MSM.

    There are other products on the market, like glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin, that are taken as supplements or applied topically to stave off joint damage. Though its benefits have not yet been proven, you might consider adding MSM, either as a supplement or a topical gel, to your regimen.

    One thing you must remember. MSM is not like aspirin or ibuprofen - products used for acute pain. Though its supporters among the medical community and patients are hoping that MSM helps the body repair itself and maintain its systems better, if you wrench your back, reach for the Advil, not MSM.

    While MSM contains plenty of sulfur, at least one medical professional notes that, while sulfur is an essential mineral for the body, there are better ways to get it into your system than MSM. Think legumes, meat and dairy, nuts and, of course, eggs.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    MSM in this case doesn’t mean mainstream media. It stands for methylsulfonylmethane, which is a form of sulfur that’s found naturally in many foods. Although some people claim MSM supplements help osteoarthritis pain, we say BS (Bad Science). There have been no large, randomly controlled studies proving that it does in fact help relieve pain from osteoarthritis. Not to mention, no one knows the long-term effects of taking MSM. So at this point, stick with your anti-inflammatories, exercise, and any prescribed medications from your doc.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Borage supplements may be labeled as borage oil, borage seed oil or borago officinalis. Borage oil also might be one ingredient in a supplement labeled gamma-linolenic acid, or GLA. GLA is an omega-6 fatty acid, found mostly in plant foods. It's considered essential to maintaining the health of bones and the reproductive system, regulating metabolism and stimulating skin and hair growth.

    Some studies suggest that borage oil may be helpful in relieving symptoms in people who have rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, but more research is needed. Consult your doctor before taking borage supplements, or any dietary supplement.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Borage supplements contain borage oil from the seeds of the borage plant. Those seeds and the oil that comes from them contain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid. Some research indicates that GLA can reduce joint pain, stiffness and tenderness in people with rheumatoid arthritis. GLA is also being studied to determine if it can reduce airway swelling in people who have asthma.