Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements
Herbal supplements are dietary supplements derived from nature. Herbal plants or parts of a plant are broken down and used for their scent, flavor and therapeutic benefits. When taken as a supplement, they can deliver strong benefits, however, herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can have dangerous side effects. They act like drugs once in your system and can affect metabolism, circulation and excretion of other substances in your body. It is important to discuss with your doctor if you are on prescription medications, are breastfeeding or have chronic illnesses and want to add herbal supplements to your health regimen.

Recently Answered

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    Most herbal remedies do not undergo testing for safety and efficacy. This needs to be a consideration especially for use in a young person. In addition, if a person takes blood thinners or antidepressants they should consult their doctor before taking Evening Primrose (or Oenothera Biennis). There are other medications that may interact with Evening Primrose and you should always get your pediatrician's approval in advance. Please first talk to your pediatrician or family doctor about the available treatment for the symptoms of PMS in such a young patient.
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of

    The main component in olive leaf is the phytochemical oleuropein. Olive leaf may have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, thus it may be able to interact with the protein in a cold or flu and slow its progress. Some research suggests that olive leaf may be able to inhibit viral replication but there is no definitive scientific consensus at this time.

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    Aconite is a homeopathic remedy that can be used to treat anxiety. It is suitable for acute situations when sudden fears overtake one rapidly. The person may have an intense fear (or presentiment) of death, as well as palpitations, shortness of breath, flushed face and trembling.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Calamus depresses the central nervous system (CNS) and causes sedation. Don't take calamus with drugs or supplements that have a similar CNS effect, including prescription sedatives or herbs, such as valerian or St. John's wort.

    Three of the four calamus species contain a carcinogen called beta-isoasarone. For that reason, the U.S. government does not allow food manufacturers to use calamus in any food products. Beta-isoasarone has also been linked to kidney damage and convulsions.

    For all these reasons, calamus should be avoided. In particular, pregnant women should not take it.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Dr. Tasneem Bhatia - What is Phosphatidylserine?

    Integrative Medicine Specialist Dr. Tasneem Bhatia explains what phosphatidylserine is and why it's healthy for you. Watch Dr. Bhatia's video for tips and information on integrative medicine solutions.


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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    What are Rhodiola supplements?
    Rhodiola is ideal for those who get tired/depressed when they are stressed out; it has a gentle stimulating effect on the nervous system and our mood. Watch acupuncturist and herbalist Mary Sabo explain the benefits of rhodiola, and how to take it. 
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Hunted in Siberia and extracted from chips, Rhodiola rosea anecdotally promotes energy, stamina, and sexual function and libido. Stuff chips into a pint container, and fill with vodka. Then try a tablespoon a night (if beet red, it will have 200 to 600 milligrams of the extract). How good is the data? Not solid enough to recommend to anyone, but a little alcohol every night keeps your cardiovascular system younger even if not in red wine.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    If you're like many Americans today -- overscheduled and overworked -- you may be suffering from excess stress. Rhodiola rosea, a plant that grows in cold regions such as Siberia, is known as an "adaptogen," an herb that increases the body's resistance to stress by reducing levels of cortisol. You can take it in pill form or try Dr. Oz's stress shot: Add Rhodiola rosea "chips" to vodka and steep for at least 24 hours until it turns pink. Drink a stress shot but make sure to have just one. Available online and at health food stores in supplement form or as "chips" for $15-$20.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Eucalyptus oil is commonly used to treat colds, coughs and congestion. It can help to break up phlegm and mucus.  It comes in all kinds of forms including tinctures and teas as well as topical oils.  Those with asthma should probably not use eucalyptus oil routinely, because it may trigger an asthma attack. It is important to consult with your doctor before using any herbal preparation.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you want to. About 70 percent of our cell membranes are made from this, and as we age, the level of phosphatidylserine drops, and the membranes become brittle. This supplement seems to strengthen cell membranes and the phospholipid sheathing around nerves, protecting the cables that transfer information from shorting out. Since risks are few, taking 200 milligrams daily is reasonable.