Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements
Herbal supplements are dietary supplements derived from nature. Herbal plants or parts of a plant are broken down and used for their scent, flavor and therapeutic benefits. When taken as a supplement, they can deliver strong benefits, however, herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can have dangerous side effects. They act like drugs once in your system and can affect metabolism, circulation and excretion of other substances in your body. It is important to discuss with your doctor if you are on prescription medications, are breastfeeding or have chronic illnesses and want to add herbal supplements to your health regimen.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Horsetail contains the bio-minerals manganese, magnesium, iron and copper necessary for the collagen and elastin biosynthesis. Horsetail also contains silicon, silica and silicic acid, of which a portion contains elemental silicon, a vital element for healthy tissues and organs of the body including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, bones, tendons and ligaments. Because the degradation of connective tissue is commonly associated with the aging process, silicon may also possess anti-aging properties. The high mineral content (including silicic acid) makes horsetail useful in bone and connective tissue strengthening, including osteoporosis.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Horseradish is an under-researched medicinal food, and unfortunately, little research has been done to either support or refute its historical uses. What is known through scientific investigation is that horseradish definitely helps protect against food-borne illness. Recent research shows that horseradish protects against
    • Listeria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and other food pathogens. The reason is allylisothiocyanate, one of the pungent chemicals formed when horseradish is cut. This powerful antibacterial ingredient constitutes 60 percent of horseradish oil.
    Horseradish is also a cholagogue, an agent that stimulates the release of bile from the gallbladder. Horseradish thus helps to maintain a healthy gallbladder and improve digestion. Increasing bile secretion is a part of digesting dietary fats and oils as well as secreting cholesterol and waste from the body.

    Horseradish also contains an enzyme called horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Commonly used as an assay to check for antibodies indicating infections, to test blood levels of glucose and lactate, and to check hormone levels for possible negative effects caused by chemicals in the environment, HRP may serve another, protective role in the future: treating contaminated soils and wastewater containing amines and phenols.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Agrimony supplements are extracted from the Agrimonia eupatoria plant, which is in the rose family.

    Agrimony has been used to treat diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome and many other conditions. It's also very high in tannins. (A tannin is a chemical found in plants and foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, wine and tea that have antioxidant properties.)

    Products containing agrimony are also used topically to treat skin inflammation.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Agrimony supplements may cause photodermatitis, a skin reaction to the sun; a drop in blood pressure; or thinning of the blood, which interferes with blood clotting.

    Tell your doctor if you take agrimony, because it could affect other medications, especially those for diabetes. Stop taking agrimony at least two weeks before surgery. 
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    Thyme has long been used as an antiseptic. Now this herb -- a favorite in savory dishes, from vinaigrettes to holiday stuffing -- has been found to have potent anti-inflammatory properties, too. That makes your heart happy, since high levels of inflammation in your body can open the door to heart disease, the number one killer in America.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Approximately 15-20% of Americans suffer from allergic rhinitis, better known as hay fever. Research shows that year-round allergies may contribute to daytime fatigue caused by nasal congestion and disrupted sleep. Quercetin nasal spray, available over the counter, has been shown to work like an antihistamine and anti-inflammatory, reducing a runny nose and watery eyes.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Suma

    Natural products found around the world are increasingly being used to treat problems such as cancer. Watch as Dr. Oz talks with alternative medicine expert Bryce Wylde in this video about natural cures found around the world.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Suma extract is a vine root that grows in the South American rain forest and is used as a tonic to regulate many systems of the body. It is a traditional medicine that acts like your body’s buffer to outside stressors. It balances blood sugar levels to combat mood swings. Suma root contains 19 different amino acids, a large number of electrolytes, trace minerals, iron, magnesium, zinc, vitamins A, B1, B2, E, and K, and pantothenic acid. Suma extract can be found online and in health food stores. Take 500 mg twice daily.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Fitness, answered
    What is natto?

    Natto is one of the best kept secrets of remote areas of Japan. In this video, fitness expert and author Tim Ferriss describes the health benefits of this fermented soybean product.

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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of

    Suma root is also known as Brazilian ginseng and is found in South America. Suma herbal root is used for many purposes but mainly as an adaptogen (helps the body deal with stress) and to increase energy, increase resistance to disease and boost overall functioning. Very little scientific evidence supports these claims but it does have a rich history of use dating back centuries. Beware, however, there have not been any evaluations or extensive formal testing conducted on the herb's toxicity, and it is speculated that it may induce estrogen-like effects in some people. Individuals who have estrogen-receptor positive (ER-positive) cancers should not use suma root. Women who are pregnant or nursing should also avoid using suma and any products which may contain it.