Hepatitis

Recently Answered

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    ARealAge answered
    If you've been diagnosed with acute hepatitis C, which is a short-term infection, you may get well with rest, good nutrition, and fluids. There is a 20-50% chance of acute hepatitis C resolving on its own. Your doctor may monitor your blood, testing every few weeks to see if the virus has gone away. If your condition fails to improve within 6 months, you may have developed chronic hepatitis C. If you have been diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C, you'll need to see your doctor regularly during treatment to be sure it's working, and to check for drug side effects.Your doctor will also check your liver regularly for signs of damage. After the virus is removed from your body, you should still see your doctor at least twice a year to check for signs of liver damage and other related problems. Depending on your condition, you may need to see your doctor more often. If you have any of these signs or symptoms of liver damage or liver cancer, see your doctor right away:
    • Weight loss
    • Loss of appetite
    • Yellowish skin or eyes
    • Itching
    • Swelling, pain or feelings of fullness in your stomach area
    • Weakness
    • Muscle cramps
    • Confusion or other changes in your mood
    • Sleep problems
    • Vomiting blood or having very dark (bloody) bowel movements
    • Menstrual changes in women
    • Sexual symptoms in men, such as being unable to have an erection or developing breasts
    • Spider veins
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    ARealAge answered
    If you've been diagnosed with acute hepatitis B, which is a short-term infection, you should get well with rest, good nutrition, and fluids. If your condition fails to improve within the time expected (usually a few weeks but no more than 6 months), you may have developed chronic hepatitis B and should call your doctor. If you have been diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B, you should see your doctor regularly to check your liver and make sure any treatments you're taking are working. For most people, this means seeing your doctor 1 to 2 times a year. But you may need to see your doctor more often, depending on your condition. You should also call your doctor right away if you become pregnant or think you might be pregnant. If you have any of these signs or symptoms of liver damage or liver cancer, see your doctor right away:
    • Weight loss
    • Loss of appetite
    • Yellowish skin or eyes
    • Itching
    • Swelling, pain or feelings of fullness in your stomach area
    • Weakness
    • Muscle cramps
    • Confusion or other changes in your mood
    • Sleep problems
    • Vomiting blood or having very dark (bloody) bowel movements
    • Menstrual changes in women
    • Sexual symptoms in men, such as being unable to have an erection or developing breasts
    • Spider veins
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    How long a course of treatment for hepatitis C takes depends on a few factors, including the type of the virus (genotype) you have, whether you’ve developed scarring of the liver (called cirrhosis) and whether you have been treated for the infection unsuccessfully before. In general, treatment typically ranges from 8 weeks to 48 weeks. The treatment is usually shortest in people who don’t have cirrhosis and haven’t been treated before.
     
    There are six genotypes of the hepatitis C virus. The combination of medications used to treat the infection and the time to complete treatment vary for each genotype. Researchers are testing drug regimens that can shorten the treatment time to as little as 8 weeks in some people. 
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    A Sudeepta Varma, MD, Psychiatry, answered
    What are some of the emotional aspects of living with Hepatitis C?
    Living with Hepatitis C can be challenging; many patients feel helpless, and there is a stigma assigned to the condition. Watch psychiatrist Sudeepta Varma, MD, discuss the emotional issues that Hep C patients experience and solutions that can help.
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    ARobert Brown, MD, Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of Columbia University Department of Surgery
    Hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver transplantation. Chronic HCV infection can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure.
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    Here's how you can stay healthy if you are living with hepatitis C:
    • Eat a healthy diet, stay physically active, see a doctor on a regular basis, and ask if you could benefit from new and better treatments.
    • Talk to your doctor before taking over-the-counter medicines and avoid alcohol because they can cause liver damage.
    • Reduce the risk of transmission to others by not donating blood or sharing personal items that might come into contact with blood.
    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    The following people should be tested for hepatitis C:
    • Born from 1945 through 1965
    • Have received blood products with clotting factor before 1987
    • Have received blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992
    • Have ever injected drugs, even if only one time
    • Have HIV
    • Have been on kidney dialysis for several years
    • Are health or public safety workers who have been stuck with a needle or other sharp object with blood from a person with hepatitis C or unknown hepatitis C status
    • Born to a mother with hepatitis C
    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    About 3 million adults in the United States are infected with the hepatitis C virus, and most are baby boomers. Up to three out of four people who are infected don't know they have hepatitis C, so they aren't getting the necessary medical care. Baby boomers -- anyone born from 1945 through 1965 -- should get tested for hepatitis C.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    A follow up test is needed after a hepatitis C antibody test, but only if the antibody test is positive. The hepatitis C antibody test can tell if you have ever been infected, but cannot tell whether you are still infected. Only a different follow-up blood test can determine if you are still infected. So that’s why the follow-up test is important. Without the follow-up test, a person will not know if they still have hepatitis C and cannot get the medical care they need.  And new CDC data shows only half of people with a positive hepatitis C antibody test had the follow-up test reported to the health department. The other half did not have a follow-up test reported, although some of them may have beentested.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    AScripps Health answered

    Infectious hepatitis A is a food- or water-borne disease (sometimes fatal) that attacks the liver. Immunization fully protects against the disease and should be taken by nearly all international travelers.