Hepatitis

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Technivie is a drug made of three medications -- ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and ritonavir -- and is used to treat patients infected with the hepatitis C genotype 4 virus. (There are six genotypes of hepatitis C.) Patients take two tablets once a day for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, patients successfully treated show no sign of the virus in the blood. Technivie is not recommended for patients who have cirrhosis or other liver damage, as it can cause liver failure. Patients who have shown sensitivity or allergy to any of the three drugs in Technivie should also avoid this drug. Side effects may include weakness, fatigue, nausea, and insomnia. Technivie can interact with a number of other medications, including fluticasone (Flonase), cyclosporine, omeprazole (Prilosec), and alprazolam (Xanax); these and other medications may need to be adjusted or replaced during the 12-week treatment period. Make sure your doctor is aware of all medications and supplements you take.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Daklinza (daclatasvir) is a drug intended to treat certain hepatitis C infections. When taken with Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), Daklinza is effective in eliminating infection by hepatitis C genotype 3 (one of the six main genotypes of hepatitis C). The drugs are usually taken together once a day for 12 weeks. Side effects are uncommon, but include headache and fatigue. Some drugs may alter the effectiveness of Daklinza and should not be taken at the same time; these include anticonvulsants like phenytoin and carbamazepine, certain antibiotics like rifampin, and St. John's wort. Daklinza's safety has not been established for children or pregnant women, or in patients who have already suffered liver damage or had a liver transplant. 
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    How long does it take to treat chronic hepatitis C?
    Chronic hepatitis C patients take oral medications for 12 or 24 weeks, depending on the stage and differences in conditions. In this video, internal medicine specialist Michael Roizen, MD, explains which specialist you must see for hep C treatment.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    How has hepatitis C treatment changed?
    Hepatitis C treatment has undergone radical changes, says internal medicine specialist Michael Roizen, MD. In this video, he discusses the new oral medications used to treat hep C with fewer side effects -- but there is one major downside.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    If you've been diagnosed with acute hepatitis C, which is a short-term infection, you may get well with rest, good nutrition, and fluids. There is a 20-50% chance of acute hepatitis C resolving on its own. Your doctor may monitor your blood, testing every few weeks to see if the virus has gone away. If your condition fails to improve within 6 months, you may have developed chronic hepatitis C. If you have been diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C, you'll need to see your doctor regularly during treatment to be sure it's working, and to check for drug side effects.Your doctor will also check your liver regularly for signs of damage. After the virus is removed from your body, you should still see your doctor at least twice a year to check for signs of liver damage and other related problems. Depending on your condition, you may need to see your doctor more often. If you have any of these signs or symptoms of liver damage or liver cancer, see your doctor right away:
    • Weight loss
    • Loss of appetite
    • Yellowish skin or eyes
    • Itching
    • Swelling, pain or feelings of fullness in your stomach area
    • Weakness
    • Muscle cramps
    • Confusion or other changes in your mood
    • Sleep problems
    • Vomiting blood or having very dark (bloody) bowel movements
    • Menstrual changes in women
    • Sexual symptoms in men, such as being unable to have an erection or developing breasts
    • Spider veins
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    If you've been diagnosed with acute hepatitis B, which is a short-term infection, you should get well with rest, good nutrition, and fluids. If your condition fails to improve within the time expected (usually a few weeks but no more than 6 months), you may have developed chronic hepatitis B and should call your doctor. If you have been diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B, you should see your doctor regularly to check your liver and make sure any treatments you're taking are working. For most people, this means seeing your doctor 1 to 2 times a year. But you may need to see your doctor more often, depending on your condition. You should also call your doctor right away if you become pregnant or think you might be pregnant. If you have any of these signs or symptoms of liver damage or liver cancer, see your doctor right away:
    • Weight loss
    • Loss of appetite
    • Yellowish skin or eyes
    • Itching
    • Swelling, pain or feelings of fullness in your stomach area
    • Weakness
    • Muscle cramps
    • Confusion or other changes in your mood
    • Sleep problems
    • Vomiting blood or having very dark (bloody) bowel movements
    • Menstrual changes in women
    • Sexual symptoms in men, such as being unable to have an erection or developing breasts
    • Spider veins
  • 1 Answer
    A
    How long a course of treatment for hepatitis C takes depends on a few factors, including the type of the virus (genotype) you have, whether you’ve developed scarring of the liver (called cirrhosis) and whether you have been treated for the infection unsuccessfully before. In general, treatment typically ranges from 8 weeks to 48 weeks. The treatment is usually shortest in people who don’t have cirrhosis and haven’t been treated before.
     
    There are six genotypes of the hepatitis C virus. The combination of medications used to treat the infection and the time to complete treatment vary for each genotype. Researchers are testing drug regimens that can shorten the treatment time to as little as 8 weeks in some people. 
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Psychiatry, answered
    What are some of the emotional aspects of living with Hepatitis C?
    Living with Hepatitis C can be challenging; many patients feel helpless, and there is a stigma assigned to the condition. Watch psychiatrist Sudeepta Varma, MD, discuss the emotional issues that Hep C patients experience and solutions that can help.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver transplantation. Chronic HCV infection can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Here's how you can stay healthy if you are living with hepatitis C:
    • Eat a healthy diet, stay physically active, see a doctor on a regular basis, and ask if you could benefit from new and better treatments.
    • Talk to your doctor before taking over-the-counter medicines and avoid alcohol because they can cause liver damage.
    • Reduce the risk of transmission to others by not donating blood or sharing personal items that might come into contact with blood.
    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)