Hepatitis

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    Hepatitis A usually plays itself out in about four weeks. Treating hepatitis A (a viral infection of the liver) is mostly a matter of managing the symptoms.Unless there are complications, you're unlikely to be hospitalized.

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    Hepatitis E is form of hepatitis (a virus that inflames the liver). It's generally found outside the U.S., in India, Pakistan, Mongolia, North Africa, and the southeast Pacific region. It's also found in the rural areas of central Mexico and Central American countries, where it can reach epidemic proportions.
    Because one of hepatitis E's major causes of transmission is through unclean food and water, it can easily picked up in under-developed countries.
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    To determine if you have hepatitis A (a viral infection of the liver) your doctor first has to take a comprehensive history. The doctor will be looking for factors that put you particularly at risk of contracting this virus including poor personal hygiene and exposure to contaminated shellfish or other food.

    After taking your history, your doctor will draw a blood test to check for a certain antibody, called the anti-HAV IgM antibody.

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    To determine if you have hepatitis E, your doctor first has to take a comprehensive history. The doctor will be looking for factors that put you particularly at risk of contracting this form of the hepatitis virus. Risk factors for hepatitis E include poor personal hygiene, exposure to contaminated shellfish, and traveling to countries that have a higher rate for this disease.
    After taking your history, your doctor will draw a blood test to check for the IgM and IgG antibodies. The doctor may also check your stool for hepatitis E particles.
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    Hepatitis A is one form of hepatitis, a viral infection of the liver. Sufferers of this condition may show no symptoms at all, or have symptoms that appear for a short time and don't automatically point to hepatitis A.

    When signs do occur, fever and rash are initially the most common. Later, patients may experience a general feeling of "being unwell" (calledmalaise), fatigue, muscle aches, weight loss, cough, abdominal pain, yellowed skin (known asjaundice), dark urine, and light-colored stools. In truly severe scenarios, liver failure may develop.

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    For reasons not totally clear, hepatitis E (HEV) is most commonly found in young adults. You can also contract this viral infection of the liver if you travel a lot, especially to under-developed countries where food and water sanitation practices aren't as strict. Hepatitis E is particularly deadly in pregnant women.

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    Viral hepatitis may not show any symptoms at all, or have symptoms that don't automatically point to the form known as hepatitis E.

    When signs do occur, fever and rash are the most common initially. Later, patients may experience a general feeling of "being unwell" (called malaise), fatigue, muscle aches, weight loss, cough, abdominal pain, yellowed skin (known as jaundice), dark urine, and light-colored stools. In truly severe scenarios, liver failure may develop.

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    Treating hepatitis E is mostly a matter of managing your symptoms until the infection runs its course. Fever and rash are initially the most common symptoms. Later, patients may experience a general feeling of "being unwell" (called malaise), fatigue, muscle aches, weight loss, cough, abdominal pain, yellowed skin (known as jaundice), dark urine, and light-colored stools. In truly severe scenarios, liver failure may develop.

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    A answered
    Infectious hepatitis A is a food- or water-borne disease (sometimes fatal) that attacks the liver. Immunization fully protects against the disease and should be taken by nearly all international travelers.
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    There is a vaccination that can prevent hepatitis A. Otherwise you should explore options for preventing this viral infection of the liver.