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How are myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases diagnosed?

When diagnosing myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases, the doctor will first ask you about your symptoms and medical history. After this, you will likely have a physical exam. The myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases cause abnormalities in your blood and bone marrow, so the doctor will usually order blood tests. A complete blood count can determine whether you are anemic while a peripheral smear, which involves the microscopic examination of individual blood cells, can determine whether your blood cells are normal or abnormal. The doctor may also wish to test for certain chromosomal abnormalities in the blood using cytogenetic analysis. Finally, the doctor may take a sample of your bone marrow by inserting a needle into your hip bone.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.