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How is heart failure with reduced ejection fraction treated?

Dr. Boris Arbit, MD
Internist

Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction can be effectively treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, like lisinopril. Beta blockers, such as metoprolol and carvedilol, are highly effective for people with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Aldosterone antagonists, like spironolactone, offer significant benefits to this population.

There is a benefit to starting black people on hydralazine and nitrates. There are cardiac resynchronization therapies performed for people who have certain types of abnormalities within their conduction system. When these are used there is a very significant improvement in their mortalities. Defibrillators are very effective in terms of saving lives.

The newest agent offered is called ARNI, which is an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. It has shown very great promise and positive outcomes in clinical trials. Sacubitril/valsartan is the generic name.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.