Heart Disease

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    To reduce your risk of heart disease, it is recommended that you exercise 30-60 minutes most days of the week. Your exercise sessions can be divided into 15 minute segments in the morning and evening. Exercise should include aerobic and weight-bearing exercise, with strength training.

    Keep in mind that exercise alone cannot tackle obesity or excess pounds. Most people with busy lives and hectic jobs can’t exercise enough to lose weight by exercise alone. A combination of portion control, calorie restrictions and exercise can produce healthy results.
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    A body mass index (BMI) indicating that you are obese or overweight increases your risk for cardiovascular disease. The body mass index (BMI) is a screening tool that uses your height and weight to measure body fat. To calculate your BMI, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers a calculator. Or you can look up your height and weight in the CDC’s BMI Index Chart. Your risk for cardiovascular disease is increased if your BMI falls within the following ranges:
    • If your BMI is 25.0 to 29.9, it falls within the “overweight” range.
    • If your BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the “obese” range.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    To reduce the cost of cardiovascular disease, lifestyle choices and preventive care are key. Healthy lifestyle choices and preventive care can save lives and cut healthcare costs.

    Cardiovascular disease, which includes coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease, dysrhythmias or heart failure, is the leading cause of death in the U.S. It is estimated that expenses related to cardiovascular disease represent 17% of overall national health expenditures.

    Several studies have linked a “favorable cardiovascular risk profile” with a significant reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease events and mortality. The American Heart Association’s Strategic Impact Goals statement calls for individuals and society to emphasize wellness and prevention. Examples of wellness campaigns include the Million Hearts Initiative designed to limit or eliminate tobacco use, encouraging active lifestyle with a focus on obesity. These prevention steps will help to reduce hypertension, promote healthy cholesterol levels and prevent diabetes.

    There should be a focus on prevention, as well as expansion of screening and counseling for modifiable cardiovascular risks, which are lifestyle factors that individuals can control through healthier choices. These efforts can play a critical role in containing healthcare costs and improving people's health.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    The costs of cardiovascular disease are as follows:
    • Highest annual costs: $14,157 in related medical costs for those with cardiovascular disease and high-risk profile for cardiovascular disease. Risk profile is based on lifestyle choices such as smoking status, diet and weight.
    • Lowest annual costs: $3,998 annual average healthcare costs for those who did not have cardiovascular disease and had an “optimal” (lowest-risk) profile.
    Expenses related to cardiovascular disease represent 17% of overall national health expenditures. Overall, $320 billion are attributed annually to direct costs of, and loss of productivity due to cardiovascular disease. During the next 15 years, cardiovascular disease costs are projected to triple.
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    To reduce your risk of heart disease, a healthy diet contains a daily serving of 25 grams of fiber for women and 38 grams of fiber for men. Not only can fiber help with digestion, it can also help you maintain healthy cholesterol levels. You can modify your cardiovascular risk by choosing fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Young people, like older adults, are also at risk of heart disease. If you are in your 20s, you should have three simple tests to check your risk of heart disease:
    • blood pressure measurement
    • blood sugar (glucose) test
    • cholesterol level
    Knowing these things can help you stay healthy. You can usually get your blood pressure checked at a pharmacy or grocery store.

    Another, more important part, of your annual physical exam is a check of your waistline -- more so than your overall weight. That's because the fat around the waist is metabolically active and, actually, makes blood pressure worse. It makes you more likely to developing diabetes and bad cholesterol. Anything you can do to try to keep your waistline trim (or reduce it by a quarter of an inch) can be very important and healthy.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Heart disease is not just a man’s disease. Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of adult women at all ages and more women than men die of heart attack every year. Although heart disease, on average, occurs ten years later in women compared to men, increasing after menopause, it’s still possible for a 25-year-old female to succumb to a heart attack. 
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Women aren’t equally represented in heart disease research for several reasons, including:
    • Heart disease continues to be perceived as a “man’s disease” by both the public and researchers so it’s less of a priority to study it in women.
    • Women are viewed as a vulnerable group. For instance, there are restrictions around including women of childbearing potential in research studies.
    • High costs of clinical studies make it hard to get enough study participants.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    The danger of not including women in heart disease research is that doctors don’t know enough about how heart disease affects them, including how it progresses or presents itself. This results in under-diagnosis and under-treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women.
     
    It is very important to consider gender when performing clinical research. Sex-specific medical research enables us to better understand the underlying physiology, risk factors, presenting symptoms, heart disease progression and outcomes. Only one-third of the cardiovascular clinical trial subjects are female and less than one-third of clinical trials that include women report outcomes by sex.
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    Many people in their 30s feel almost indestructible. They are at their peak physical and mental health and often view chronic health problems, including heart problems, as something they don't have to think about.

    However, the things we do when we're younger have a way of causing big problems as we age. And, it doesn't take too long to affect us, either. Smoking, not getting physical exercise, using drugs, drinking too much alcohol and an unhealthy diet can quickly lead to poor heart health and inability to enjoy life's activities.
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