Heart Disease

Recently Answered

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    People with a family history of aortic dissection should be screened for it. They are important candidates for preventative screening, with frequent and careful surveillance beginning 10-15 years before the age of the family member who had a dissection. If people are approaching the age at which one of their family members suffered an aortic dissection, they need to be very vigilant.

    Other people who should be screened include
    • people who have had an aortic aneurysm
    • people with a family history of aortic aneurysms
    • people with a family history of premature sudden death
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    Aortic dissection is relatively rare, but it can be fatal. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that each year, arotic dissection is the primary or contributing cause in more than 15,000 deaths in the U.S. When an aortic dissection occurs in the first part of the aorta, up to 90% of people can be saved with emergency surgery. But as many as 40% of people with aortic dissections die instantly, and the risk of the death increases 1% every hour the diagnosis and surgical repair are delayed.
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    Risk factors for aortic dissection include:
    • poorly controlled high blood pressure
    • injury to the chest
    • extreme exertion
    • drug abuse
    • connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome
    • family history of arotic dissection
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    A study found that aortic dissections have the potential to run in families and often occur within 10 years of the same age. The researchers found the people who experienced an aortic dissection between the ages of 30 to 49 years, 71% of familial dissections occurred in that timeframe. For those aged 60 to 79 years at the time of onset, 80% of other family member dissections occurred beyond the age of 50 years.

    People with a family member who had an aortic dissection should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. This allows doctors to combat it more effectively. If a family member suffered an aortic aneurysm or aortic dissection, chances are at least one in eight that you may experience something similar in the future.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Death due to heart disease is more common in men than in women until you get to approximately age 60. Once you get over the age of 60, the death rate equalizes over a period of time, and then as it gets into the 70s and 80s, more women die of heart disease. The big thing to remember is more women die of heart disease than they do of breast cancer. Overall, the incidence of heart disease in the U.S. has decreased in both men and women over the last 15 to 20 years (but has stabilized over the last year and is no longer dropping).
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    What is Aquapherisis Treatment for Congestive Heart Failure?
    Aquapherisis uses a large IV to drain fluid from the lungs and can help alleviate shortness of breath associated with congestive heart failure, says Rajdeep Gadh, MD, of Westside Medical Center. Learn more the treatment in this video.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    What Lifestyle Changes Are Recommended for Heart Disease Patients?
    Patients with heart disease have to realize they will need a lifestyle change, says Frederick Chaleff, MD, of Westside Regional Medical Center. Learn more about recommended changes and how patients can stay heart-healthy. 
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    What happens if I don't get a blocked aortic valve treated?
    Without treatment, survival with a severely blocked aortic valve is less than 50%, says Marcos Nores, MD, of JFK Medical Center. In this video, he explains why it's important to get surgery when it's recommended.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    What is a leaking mitral valve?
    A severely leaking mitral valve can lead to a weakening of the heart muscle and cause heart failure, says Marcos Nores, MD, of JFK Medical Center. In this video, he explains what happens to the heart when blood leaks from the mitral valve.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    You should change your lifestyle and make heart healthy choices because diet and lifestyle have a profound effect on preventing cardiovascular disease.  This is accomplished by affecting risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugars and your body weight.

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