Heart Disease

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    What are the latest dietary guidelines for heart disease prevention?
    The latest dietary guidelines for heart health are what you would expect, though the focus on cholesterol has shifted. In this video, cardiologist Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, discusses the best food options and why limiting saturated fats is still key.
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    A answered
    Cor pulmonale is a serious heart condition that can result in heart failure. It is usually caused by long-term high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs that leads to enlargement and thickening of the right ventricle of the heart. That enlargement and thickening make it harder for the heart to pump blood normally, which ultimately results in heart failure.

    The following chronic lung conditions that may cause low oxygen levels in the blood can lead to cor pulmonale:
    • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
    • chronic blood clots in the lungs
    • cystic fibrosis
    • scarring of the lung tissue
    • obstructive sleep apnea, which causes periods of stopped breathing during sleep
    Symptoms of cor pulmonale may include:
    • shortness of breath and a pounding heart during exercise
    • feeling lightheaded
    • fatigue
    • chest pain
    • swelling in the legs, ankles and/or feet
    • bluish tint to lips and fingers
    Call your doctor if you have any of these symptoms.
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    A answered
    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening condition in which excess fluid around the heart compresses the heart, impairing the heart's ability to pump blood normally. Cardiac tamponade can occur after heart surgery, or result from infection, end-stage lung cancer, kidney failure, heart injury, or many other possible causes.

    Symptoms of cardiac tamponade may include:
    • shortness of breath or rapid breathing
    • dizziness
    • fainting
    • anxiety or restlessness
    • chest pain that may get worse with coughing or deep breathing
    • sharp pain in the neck, shoulder, abdomen or back
    • heart palpitations
    • pale, grayish or bluish skin
    • stomach swelling
    Call 911 or go straight to the emergency room if you experience symptoms of cardiac tamponade.
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    Corlanor (ivabradine) is a drug prescribed to treat certain patients suffering from chronic heart failure. Patients likely to benefit from taking twice-daily Corlanor tablets include those:
    • whose lower-left heart is not pumping well
    • whose heart failure symptoms are stable
    • who are taking beta blockers at the highest dose they can tolerate
    • who have a normal resting heartbeat of at least 70 beats per minute.
    Corlanor slows down the heart and allows the heart to pump more blood with each beat.

    Corlanor is not recommended for pregnant women or those planning to become pregnant as it may cause fetal harm. Breastfeeding is also discouraged. Patients should report any adverse effects to their doctor right away; these may include dizziness, fatigue, low blood pressure, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, or chest pain. Patients with a history of liver impairment should avoid this drug. Patients are also advised to avoid grapefruit juice and St. John's wort while taking Corlanor. 
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Preventatitve Cardiology
    Preventive cardiology helps patients find ways to improve their heart health through a healthy lifestyle. In this video, Samuel Rougas, MD of Aurora Denver Cardiology Associates in Colorado shares preventive strategies for a healthy heart. 
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    With risk factors of cardiovascular disease, such as diet, sedentary lifestyle, stress, body mass index (BMI), etc., there are many studies that conclude that the more healthy habits we developed earlier in life, the more likely we will be able to maintain these habits, and the more likely we will benefit with a longer, healthier life, free from disease. A recent study published in "Circulation" hits this point -- 55 year olds who had prolonged, moderately elevated non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels (≥ 160) when they were young adults were much more likely than their peers to have coronary heart disease by the time they were 70, in an analysis based on the Framingham Offspring Cohort. In essence, having decades of exposure to what many would consider mild to moderately elevated cholesterol levels is associated with a significantly elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Some state that the way we think about smoking in terms of “pack-years,” we should be thinking about “lipid-years” of exposure to high cholesterol.

    Young adults need to remember that the foundation for cardiovascular disease is being laid in our 20s, 30s and 40s, and risk factor modification at that age may be really important.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Why Is Heart Disease More Prevalent in Women?
    Heart disease is more prevalent in women after menopause. In this video, Syed Bokhari, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Riverside Community Hospital, discusses the issues of women's lives and health that affects their risk for heart disease.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    What Have We Learned in Recent Years About Women and Heart Disease?
    In recent years, experts have determined that women have been undertreated for heart disease. In this video, Syed Bokhari, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Riverside Community Hospital, says that one in three women dies from heart disease.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    How do tests screen for heart disease?
    There are tests that look at the major vascular areas of the heart. In this video, Michael Isaac, MD, Cardiologist at Medical City Dallas Hosptial explains which areas of the heart are being evaluated to determine risk of heart disease.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    It's not infrequent that healthy people suffer from cardiac events. I've had marathon runners come in who have run 26-mile races. They weigh 150 pounds. They're men, 5 foot 10 inches tall and on a vegetarian diet, but they come in with chest pain and are having a massive heart attack. It's genetic predisposition. They may stay in shape, eat exactly right, have normal blood pressure and not smoke, but their arteries are horrible because of a genetic predisposition.

    If you have a genetic predisposition, it doesn't mean you shouldn't be in shape or eat right, but you shouldn’t ignore it. Just because you're thin and are vegan, it doesn't mean you can't have heart disease.