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Eat This for Breakfast for a Young Heart

Eat This for Breakfast for a Young Heart

Intensify the heart-strengthening benefit of your morning meal by tossing fresh berries into your whole-grain cereal.

This fruit-and-cereal combo gives you two types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. And research shows that ample amounts of both may be key to maintaining a young heart and reducing the risk of dying from heart disease.

Fiber-Up Your Future
Plant-based foods are your essential fiber source because dietary fiber is a substance found only in plants. We're talking fruit, nuts, seeds, vegetables, and whole grains like whole-grain cereal. And in a 14-year study, people with the highest intakes of fiber -- particularly fiber from fruit and whole grains -- had about an 18% lower risk of dying from heart disease compared to folks with minimal fiber intake.

Fabulous Protective Fiber
Fiber's heart-saving magic is a triple threat: It improves cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, and reduces belly fat -- all good things in terms of lowering the risk of heart disease and sustaining a healthy young heart. As a bonus, fiber helps steady blood sugar, too. Surprisingly, the recent study showed that insoluble fiber -- the stuff that helps keep you regular -- may have an even more intense heart-protective effect than soluble fiber does. People with the highest intake of insoluble fiber had about a 50% lower risk of dying from heart disease compared with a 28% risk reduction in people with the highest intake of soluble fiber. Still, we know that both kinds of fiber bestow important health benefits. So aim for balance -- and try to get your fiber from a variety of sources. (Get tips on boosting the nutritional benefits of your fruits and vegetables.)

Take the first steps to growing younger and healthier with the RealAge Test.

Medically reviewed in April 2019.

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