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How is blood sugar related to heart attack risk?

Dr. Alvaro A. Gomez, MD
Interventional Cardiologist

Blood sugar can be a key indicator for determining heart attack risk. We are starting to see more and more of a trend in studies that find sugar is bad for you. Sugar and its properties help increase weight and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1C readings are used to identify people at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

  • A fasting blood sugar from 70 to 99 is considered normal.
  • Readings from 100 to 125 fall in the pre-diabetic range.
  • Diabetes is diagnosed when someone has two readings greater than 125.           

This content originally appeared online at Baptist Health South Florida.

Dr. Saeed Payvar, MD
Cardiologist (Heart Specialist)

Saeed Payvar, MD, with West Valley Cardiology Services, says blood sugar is related to heart attack risk because diabetes does affect the larger vessels. Learn more about this heart attack risk by watching the video now.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.