Try Chinese Exercise for Heart Attack Recovery
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Try Chinese Exercise for Heart Attack Recovery

After a heart attack in 1996, Dodgers’ manager Tommy Lasorda retired from baseball. That was 20 years ago. Today, the Hall of Fame manager is almost 90!  A cardiologist familiar with Lasorda has said that the keys to a long and productive life following a heart attack (Lasorda had another “minor” one in 2012) are medications to control blood cholesterol, blood pressure and diabetes, as well as low-dose aspirin. And then, of course, there’s adopting the healthy lifestyle.

Besides sticking with a low-saturated-fat diet, there’s evidence that if you have cardiovascular disease (CVD) appropriate exercise makes your heart and blood vessels much healthier. Researchers at Shanghai University of Sport in China reviewed 35 studies that included some 2,250 participants from 10 countries. They found that among those with heart disease, Chinese exercise, such as Tai Chi or Qigong, helped reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significantly helped reduce lousy LDL cholesterol levels too. The researchers also say that Chinese exercise improves quality of life and reduces depression for folks with CVD.

We’ve always promoted walking 10,000 steps a day, along with a nutritious diet, for a healthy cardiovascular system. And, as the Shanghai study has shown, aerobic exercise delivers additional benefits. Thirty minutes of light Tai Chi equals 2,000 steps and it’s a great place to start on your way to getting in 10,000 steps daily. You can do it! As coach Lasorda always said: “The difference between the impossible and the possible lies in a person's determination.”

Heart Attack

Heart Attack

Heart attack (myocardial infarction (MI), is the leading cause of death among Americans. It often results from coronary artery disease, the most common form of heart disease to affect adults. See your doctor immediately if you fee...

l pressure or a squeezing sensation in your chest, neck, jaw, shoulders, back or arms, especially if it’s accompanied by sweating, nausea, vomiting, or shortness of breath.
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