Healthy Sleeping

Healthy Sleeping

Healthy Sleeping
Healthy sleep isn't just about getting enough sleep; getting the right kind counts, too. While you sleep your brain stays active, and it actually takes several stages of sleep to make you feel well and refreshed. Just how much sleep we need changes as we age, from 16 to 18 hours a day for newborns to 7 to 8 hours a night for adults. If you find yourself feeling tired or fatigued during the day even after a full night in bed, you may have a sleep disorder. See your family doctor or a sleep specialist for help.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Psychology, answered
    To sleep better and lose weight, try these tips:

    Lose the snooze and set your alarm to tell you when to go to bed. Use your alarm to help you know when to go bed to get the right amount of quality sleep. Don't use the snooze button to potentially interrupt those final minutes of REM sleep! Set your alarm in the morning for the last possible minute you need to be out of bed.

    Take a quick nap if you are feeling drowsy in the middle of the day. Try my Nap-a-Latte™ technique: quickly drink a small cup of cool drip coffee, and then take a 25-minute nap. The Nap-a-Latte™ reduces your drowsiness and the caffeine will wake you up, but taken at the right time (no caffeine after 2 p.m.!) will not keep you awake at night.

    Try my "glass for a glass method": Drink one glass of water for every alcoholic beverage you drink, and stop all alcohol 3 hours before your bedtime alarm goes off. Alcohol can help you fall asleep, but will keep you out of the deep stages of sleep and REM sleep that you need to avoid sleep deprivation.

    Stop exercise 4 hours before bed. Work out earlier in the evening and consider Yoga, deep breathing or stretching before bed.

    Have your breakfast outside in the morning, and get plenty of sunlight to help re-set your internal biological clock.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Dead Man's Float: This sleeper spends the night prone, on his stomach, head turned to the side, with arms splayed under the pillow.

    The problem: In this position you hyper-flex the neck and exert pressure on the nerves along the underside of your arms that can cause pins and needles and awaken you from sleep. The body's weight compresses the lungs, preventing a fully expanded deep breath. It also exerts unnecessary pressure on the breasts.

    The fix: Don't use a head pillow at all. Try raising the whole side of your body slightly with a long pillow, or place a pillow under your hips.

     



    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Psychology, answered
    Here are some basic guidelines you can follow that will help prevent your alcohol consumption from interfering with your sleep:
    •  A glass for a glass: For every alcoholic drink you consume, also drink a glass of water.
    • Cork the bottle early. Don’t drink alcohol within three hours of bedtime.
    • Break the bedtime habit. Avoid using alcohol directly as a sleep aid. Instead, look for other relaxation aids -- music, meditation -- that will promote healthy sleep.
    By understanding how alcohol affects your body -- and why its temporary lulling effects aren’t actually a path to real rest -- it’s possible to enjoy your favorite spirit in moderation and still protect the quality of your sleep.
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  • 3 Answers
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    Sleeping Teenager

    Research shows that a midday nap of 30 to 60 minutes can improve the ability to learn a new motor skill and can reverse information overload.

    These 30-minute naps seem to prevent on-the-job burnout, while an hour-long snooze can actually boost performance back to early morning levels.


    Theoretically, during sleep the brain is able to store information it has gathered into memory. Taking a nap at midday allows to file everything we've gathered to that point and to wake up with empty storage space.

    Sleeping Teenager
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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Next time you find yourself squirming like a toddler in church as you're trying to get to sleep, try this relaxation and sleep-promoting move taken from the practices of chi-gong.
    1. Rub your hands together to warm them (and gather chi). Place each palm over the respective eye.
    2. Press the center bone that sticks out on top of each eye with each index finger.
    3. Press the outside corner of your eye at the bone.
    4. Press the bottom center of the eye on the inside of the bone.
    5. Press the inside of each eye.
    6. Use your thumbs to push where the jaw and cheekbone meet at the temporomandibular junction.
    7. Pinch the ears around the pinna from the top to the bottom.
    8. End the sequence with the move called "Beating the Heavenly Drum," by tapping the back of your head nine times with your hands; the thumbs rest on the neck as an axis.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Psychology, answered
    The decision to sleep together as a family is a highly personal and individual one that can be influenced by several factors, including:
    • Convenience: Parents may feel it’s simply easier to sleep together, particularly when breast feeding.
    • Bonding: Parents may find co-sleeping a way to connect emotionally with their children and bond as a family.
    • Living circumstances: Space constraints in a home and other environmental circumstances may make co-sleeping a necessity.
    • Cultural norms: In some cultures co-sleeping is very common.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    What emotional strengths should encourage in my child
    Good sleep is very important to a child's overall health and even behavior. Watch this video as Dr. Mike Roizen and Dr. Ellen Rome discuss what you can do to promote your child's good sleep habits right from the start.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    We know we talk a lot about how important it is to get enough sleep and how vital it is to stay active. Here's a reason why: You can't have one without the other.

    This news didn't rock our world. We've long known that exercise helps you sleep better. But that fact has been highlighted in neon pink, thanks to very specific data from a recent study.

    If you get more than 20 minutes (go for 30 minutes) of exercise a day, you won't just sleep better. You'll sleep much better, getting 65% more restorative REM sleep. You'll also have energy to burn and you’ll be more alert, which means you’ll be less likely to zone out during meetings and more likely to know what your spouse said to you two minutes ago. Bonus: If you're prone to leg cramps at night, you can likely kiss those goodbye. Pretty slick for just 20 minutes of walking! Go for 30 minutes. (Did we say that already?)
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Meditation appears to place people in a more relaxed state, both mentally and physically. With a clear mind (from focused meditation) you will have a greater likelihood to falling asleep, and the physical relaxation will allow your body to fall asleep more easily as part of the physical process of falling asleep requires physical relaxation.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    Sleep can be divided into rapid eye movement (REM) sleep when you have dreams, and sleep during which your eyes don't move, called non-REM sleep. The deeper stages of non-REM sleep are also referred to as restorative sleep. Healthy adults who sleep 8 hours a night will spend approximately 6 hours in non-REM sleep and 2 hours in REM sleep. Sleep generally occurs by moving through a series of stages, starting with the lightest: Stage 1 of non-REM sleep; moving to deeper stages of non-REM sleep; and, finally, to REM, or dream, sleep. It's easy to be roused during the lighter stages of sleep. If you wake up during Stage 1, you'll probably feel as if you haven't slept at all. This is often the stage people experience when they fall asleep in front of the television. When you wake them up, they might say, "I wasn't sleeping. I was just resting my eyes."

    Sleepwalking can occur during the deep sleep you experience before REM sleep. Once you're in dream sleep, you can no longer move. Some experts believe this temporary paralysis during dream sleep is the body's natural defense to keep people from acting out their dreams while they are asleep.

    In general, people spend approximately 90 minutes in non-REM sleep before REM sleep begins. They continue to move through this cycle of light, to deep, to REM sleep, and back to light sleep again throughout the night. You may hear people say, "I was in a deep sleep all night," but everybody actually shifts between light and deep sleep several times each night.