What are health benefits of apple cider vinegar?

Alejandro Junger, MD
Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease)
Apple cider vinegar is one of the oldest remedies for your body; it promotes good digestion and assimilation of nutrients. In this video, cardiologist Alejandro Junger, MD, explains the healthy benefits of apple cider vinegar and how to use it. 
Anthony L. Komaroff, MD
Internal Medicine
If you believe the stories written about apple cider vinegar, it is a miracle cure for just about anything that ails you, from curbing the appetite to detoxifying the body, boosting the immune system, treating arthritis, and improving circulation. That's a tall order for a brew made from fermented apples. But there's no evidence to back up most of these claims. So far, the only decent studies in humans suggest that daily doses of apple cider vinegar may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar.

Acetic acid is the substance that gives vinegar its distinctive smell and sour taste. A synthetic cousin of acetic acid, called ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), attracts some dissolved metals. It is used in cases of lead, mercury, or iron poisoning to pull these metals out of the bloodstream. A dubious practice called chelation therapy involves repeated administration of EDTA. Chelation therapy is hyped as a way to clean out the arteries by dissolving cholesterol-filled plaque. This is based on wishful thinking, not science.

Apple cider vinegar is a terrific ingredient in foods, sauces, and dressings. It isn't medicine. Taking too much can lower blood potassium levels and may not be good for your bones. If you choose to take a tablespoon or so a day, rinse out your mouth afterward -- straight apple cider vinegar can erode the enamel on your teeth.

Continue Learning about Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods

A healthy diet is rich in foods with high nutritional value, providing your body with the vitamins, minerals and other food nutrients it needs to protect against disease and maintain a healthy weight. To identify healthy foods, it...

's important to read nutrition labels and know the source of your food. Products advertised as whole-grain, organic or fortified may not necessarily be healthy for you. Find out how to get the most health value from various fruits, nuts, spices, oils and vegetables -- and learn which types of red meat and processed foods to avoid -- with expert advice from Sharecare.
More

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.