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How are athletic programs trained in recognizing concussions?

Karen L. Gorton, PhD, MS, RN
Emergency Room Nursing

Many athletic programs have the benefit of having a professional health care staff. This staff may include some or all of the following: Certified Athletic Trainer; Family Practice Physician; Sports Medicine Physician; Physical Therapist; and Emergency Medical Technician.

The Physicians and Certified Athletic Trainers have coursework in the recognition and evaluation of concussions as a part of their training. The other professionals may have taken additional training, which allows them to better recognize the signs and symptoms of concussion. 

If the athletic program where you have participants does not have access to any of these staff, ask if the coaching staff have training in concussion recognition. If you have any concerns about an individual who may have a concussion, take them to be evaluated by your health care provider. 

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.