Hair Coloring

Hair Coloring

Recently Answered

  • 3 Answers
    A
    Coloring your hair can cause damage to your scalp if you're allergic to the dye.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Coloring your hair can cause it to become dry and brittle. Dermatologists recommend using treatments such as coloring on a limited basis and using a conditioner every time you shampoo to improve the strength and increase the shine of your hair. Also, be especially gentle with color treated hair, limiting your use of heated products such as curling irons or blow dryers. Taking especially good care of your hair after you have had a chemical treatment such as a coloring will help keep your hair healthy.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Chemical processing, such as coloring, can harm your hair. Here’s how to minimize the damage.

    Semi-permanent color: All coloring processes reduce elasticity to some degree (less elasticity means more breakage). Semi-permanent color is less damaging than permanent color or lifting (colorists’ fancy word for bleaching). Leave-in conditioners can help smooth the cuticle, which increases shine and helps your hair hold on to color for longer.

    Permanent dye: Permanent dye deposits color into your hair shaft. The solution most likely contains hydrogen peroxide and ammonia to open up the cuticle and drive the color molecules into the hair. Unless a full bleaching process is required to change the hair color, permanent dyes are less damaging than lifting/bleaching. However, the cuticle (the outside layer of hair) still gets roughed up a bit. Leave-in conditioners can help smooth the cuticle, which increases shine and helps your hair hold on to color for longer.

    Unless you have extreme color fade, it’s not necessary to color your entire head every time. Just concentrate on the roots. If you repeatedly darken your entire head, your ends will get darker over time. If your hair looks brassy, counteract it with a cool-toned gloss (also known as toner), which will restore your color without depositing more pigment.

    Highlights: Highlights lift, aka bleach, the hair -- a process that requires hydrogen peroxide to strip the natural color. This increases porosity, leading to less shine and more breakage. With highlights, you’re not lifting your entire head of hair, which does minimize the amount of potential damage, but it’s important to treat your highlights with tender loving care to prevent as much breakage as possible. Get in the habit of using a protein-rich hair mask regularly. Adding protein back into the hair will help fill in the holes and decrease breakage.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    No matter how "permanent" your chemical hair color claims to be, or how expertly it was applied, all dyes will fade with time. Exposure to sun, air, and harsh shampoos can hasten the fading and contribute to a lackluster shade. When coloring your hair, I recommend using a semi-permanent rather than a permanent hair color system. Semi-permanents are far gentler than permanent dyes and are designed to fade over time, allowing you to replenish your color sooner without causing as much damage. Also, use shampoos and conditioners that are designed for the maintenance of hair color.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    Bleached Blonde

    Large terminal scalp hair shafts are composed of three distinct zones or parts - the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle. The cuticle is an unpigmented, protective protein covering constructed in a sort of overlapping scale configuration. The cortex constitutes the majority of the hair shaft and contains the pigmenting that determines the color of the hair. In order to change hair color significantly, one's actual hair color must be neutralized so that the hair can be re-colored by hair dye of a chosen shade. A bleaching solution consists of an alkaline component that opens the cuticle and a bleaching component that irreversibly oxidizes the melanin pigment of the cortex, leaving the hair shaft the whitish to yellowish color of the keratin protein. The bleaching component is typically a hydrogen peroxide. In addition to stripping the cortex of pigment, this powerful oxidant interacts with the disulfide bonds within the keratin protein structure, weakening the structural composition of the hair shaft. Bleaching can be a damaging process to the hair and should be undertaken with care.


    Bleached Blonde
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Although hair dyes can increase your risk for breakage, you can still have healthy, color-treated hair. Start by carefully following the directions for applying the dye. Don't use the product more than is recommended by the manufacturer. To help protect the health of your hair, experts recommend staying within three shades of your natural color when you dye it. Dying your hair darker rather than lighter is also generally better for your hair. If you dye your hair, you may want to minimize your use of other chemical processes, such as hair permanent waves or relaxers, which can further damage your hair.

    Also minimize your use of blow dryers, flat irons and curling irons because exposure to heat may increase hair damage. Choosing shampoos and conditioners formulated for color-treated hair may also help keep it looking healthy. Consult your dermatologist for other ways to keep your hair healthy when you use hair dye.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    You can lighten your brows to make them appear more subtle, but don’t try bleaching your own brows at home. “They can turn orange,” celebrity brow expert Anastasia Soare told us. “Instead, try semi-permanent hair color in a lighter shade, and leave it on for just one minute. It’s safer to do it again in a few days (if you still want to go lighter).”
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    The best hair dye for you may depend on the color change you are looking for. If you want to be able to wash out the color with shampooing, then using a natural dye, such as henna, or a semi-permanent commercial brand product may be best. If you want hair color that won't wash out, look for a permanent hair coloring product.

    No matter what type of hair coloring product you choose, make sure to follow the package directions carefully, wear plastic gloves when applying the dye, and apply it only to the hair on your head, never to your eyebrows or eyelashes.

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also recommends doing a patch test before you apply hair color all over your head, as in some people hair coloring products may cause skin irritation or even allergic reactions. To do a patch test, rub a little bit of the dye on the inside of your elbow or behind your ear and wait two days. If a rash results, do not apply the hair color to your hair. If your skin has no reaction, it is probably safe to use the hair color on your head.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    If you're going to dye your hair (even though I think you look just fine), going to a professional colorist can be the easiest (albeit priciest) solution, and can decrease your exposure to potential toxins from the hair-coloring chemicals. But if you want to do it at home, follow these safety steps:

    • Don't leave the dye on your head any longer than necessary. Rinse your scalp thoroughly with water after use.
    • Wear gloves when applying hair dye (nitrile gloves are the best when dealing with chemicals), and carefully follow the directions.
    • Never be a home chemist and mix different hair dye products - you never know what you may create. Your kids may only blow up the house with their chemistry-set experiments; you could ruin your hair and injure your scalp.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    1 157 03 what hair color says about health
    Hair color can be related to  different health conditions or diseases.

    To learn more about the relationship between hair color and health, watch this video by Dr. Oz. 



    See All 2 Answers