Hair Coloring

Hair Coloring

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    Coloring your hair can cause damage to your scalp if you're allergic to the dye.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    No matter how "permanent" your chemical hair color claims to be, or how expertly it was applied, all dyes will fade with time. Exposure to sun, air, and harsh shampoos can hasten the fading and contribute to a lackluster shade. When coloring your hair, I recommend using a semi-permanent rather than a permanent hair color system. Semi-permanents are far gentler than permanent dyes and are designed to fade over time, allowing you to replenish your color sooner without causing as much damage. Also, use shampoos and conditioners that are designed for the maintenance of hair color.

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    A answered
    Water fades hair color. In fact, up to 80% of color fade is due to water alone. Your hair absorbs water, and as your hair dries, the dyes drain out with the water. If you’re a staunch everyday washer, try every other day. To stretch out the time between washes, try a dry shampoo on your roots to absorb oil and pump up volume (available at salons or drugstores).
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - grey hair

    There's no way to keep grey away between appointments with your colorist (otherwise, she wouldn't have a job!) But you can hide wayward greys. Learn how by watching this video featuring Louis Licari, celebrity hair stylist and Dr. Oz Show guest.


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    A , Cosmetology, answered
    Coloring your hair to hide the gray is a great way to hide the telltale signs of aging. Choose a color that is close to your original color, so it naturally complements your facial tones. If you like, consider highlights or lowlights, since they do not require redoing as often.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Read all package instructions before using hair dye. Consider trying a small sample of hair dye on a patch of skin, such as your inner arm, before applying it to your hair. If your skin develops a rash within a few days, you may be allergic to the hair dye. Also follow these additional precautions:
    • Never apply hair dye to your eyebrows or eyelashes.
    • Never mix hair dye products.
    • Wear gloves when applying hair dye.
    • Don't leave dye in place longer than instructed.
    • Keep hair dye away from children.
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    For locks that are about 20 to 25% gray, use a demi- or semi-permanent hair color that’s closest to your natural tone in order to blend away the grays with minimal damage to the hair. Both types deposit color without ammonia, but the demi-permanent color "uses a stronger concentration of hydrogen peroxide to open up the hair cuticle and inject more color," Perry Romanowski, a cosmetic chemist in Chicago, told us. As a result, demi-permanent color lasts almost twice as long as semi-permanent.  Semi-permanent color delivers a rich, shiny color but fades out in six to 12 shampoos.

    If more than half of your hair is gray, go the permanent color route. Permanent hair color contains ammonia which opens the hair cuticle to allow the color to penetrate.

    Many colorists advise not taking on the challenge of coloring gray hair yourself -- at least not the first time. Keep in mind that if things go haywire as you DIY, the color correction can cost more than a regular salon visit for coloring.
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    Coloring your hair can cause damage to your scalp if you're allergic to the dye.

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    Lead acetate is used as a color additive in "progressive" hair dye products. These products are put on over a period of time to produce a gradual coloring effect. You can safely use these products if you follow the directions carefully. This warning statement must appear on the product labels of lead acetate hair dyes:

    "Caution: Contains lead acetate. For external use only. Keep this product out of children's reach. Do not use on cut or abraded scalp. If skin irritation develops, discontinue use. Do not use to color mustaches, eyelashes, eyebrows, or hair on parts of the body other than the scalp. Do not get in eyes. Follow instructions carefully and wash hands thoroughly after use."

    This answer is based on the source infromation from the National Women's Health Information Center.

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    Bleached Blonde

    Large terminal scalp hair shafts are composed of three distinct zones or parts - the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle. The cuticle is an unpigmented, protective protein covering constructed in a sort of overlapping scale configuration. The cortex constitutes the majority of the hair shaft and contains the pigmenting that determines the color of the hair. In order to change hair color significantly, one's actual hair color must be neutralized so that the hair can be re-colored by hair dye of a chosen shade. A bleaching solution consists of an alkaline component that opens the cuticle and a bleaching component that irreversibly oxidizes the melanin pigment of the cortex, leaving the hair shaft the whitish to yellowish color of the keratin protein. The bleaching component is typically a hydrogen peroxide. In addition to stripping the cortex of pigment, this powerful oxidant interacts with the disulfide bonds within the keratin protein structure, weakening the structural composition of the hair shaft. Bleaching can be a damaging process to the hair and should be undertaken with care.


    Bleached Blonde
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