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What is the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)?

Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is aimed at preventing or minimizing symptoms. Treatments include:  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) - NSAIDs taken before or at the onset of your period can ease cramping and breast discomfort. Antidepressants - Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) reduce symptoms such as fatigue, food cravings and sleep problems. Oral contraceptives - Oral contraceptives stop ovulation and stabilize hormone fluctuations, which can help to reduce mood swings.  Diet and Lifestyle Changes - Regular exercise often helps to reduce premenstrual symptoms. Decreasing caffeine intake can alleviate anxiety and irritability. Also, your doctor or nutritionist can make additional recommendations on the types of foods and vitamins that may be helpful for you.  Please follow up with your doctor to see what the best course of action is for you and your condition.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.