Green Health

Green Health

Green Health
You can take of yourself AND the environment simply by practicing green health. Small changes like ditching the bottled water and opting for a reusable BPA-free one or cutting down on energy use by skipping the treadmill and heading outside for a hike can make a big different for the environment. Even the cleaning products you use can be a little greener by purchasing only those with natural ingredients. Turns out, it is easy being green.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Here are some tips for safer, cleaner dry cleaning:

    • Limit dry cleaning to only what absolutely has to be dry-cleaned.
    • Use only dry cleaners that have stopped using either trichloroethylene or perchloroethelyene (PERC). These chemicals have been linked to kidney and nervous system damage as well as cancer (in the person wearing the clothes, as well as the person cleaning them).
    • If you get your clothes dry-cleaned, remove them from the plastic wrap, which traps in the chemicals used to clean them, and air them out on a porch or another covered area that is open to the outside air.
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Internal Medicine, answered

      Start by unplugging unused appliances. The newer computers are great at saving energy in the "sleep" mode, but make sure yours has an EPA Energy Star label. This tells you your trusty old computer isn't burning unnecessary fuel. If you have a less efficient model, turn it off after using it. And think about buying an energy saving "Smart Strip" by BITS Limited. This gem automatically shuts off your printer and other devices when you turn off your computer.
      Also make a conscious effort to use rechargeable batteries; you'll save money and keep landfills clear of toxic batteries. Today's chargers are more powerful and faster than the old ones. And don't forget to recycle the batteries that can no longer be charged?

    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
      3_062_2_What_Can_You_Do

      All those "green" cleaning products on store shelves can be confusing and overwhelming. In this video, Dr. Oz and EPA administrator Lisa Jackson share an easy way you can make earth-friendly choices in the cleaning product aisle.


    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Medical Toxicology, answered
      There are many actions we can take to show Mama Earth we still care about the planet and our future on it. One clear message is to go organic with your lawn and garden care. If not completely organic at first, you can at least use integrated pest management (IPM) techniques to take control of your piece of real estate and nurse it back from addiction to chemicals.

      There are many reasons to do so, but as a toxicologist, it is my duty to put in front of you the emerging information about cancer risk. In one study, dogs were found to be at higher risk of canine malignant lymphoma (the dog version of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) if the yard was treated regularly by a lawn company.

      Since such findings are still at the level of association without ironclad proof, the companies have plausible deniability and you probably won’t win a court case against them if your dog (or, god forbid, your child) gets cancer.

      But why deal with the possible risk when it’s easy to just say no to one of the major sources of toxic chemicals most homeowners, children and pets come in contact with: lawn chemicals. Most people don’t realize that more pesticides and fertilizers are applied per acre on residential lawns than on commercial farms. It’s pointless to worry about the pesticides on your produce if you hire a commercial lawn company.
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

      The "father" of the Green Revolution is considered to be Norman Borlaug, an American agricultural scientist who in 1970 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for breeding higher-yielding varieties of wheat at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Mexico. Borlaug's wheat, a hybrid, or offspring, of wheat varieties from the U.S., the Russian Federation, Japan, and Mexico, has numerous favorable traits, such as short stature of the wheat stalk, which prevents the wheat from growing too tall and falling or breaking; an increased number of grains per plant; strong resistance to disease; and improved tolerance to the environment. These same sorts of improvements have been made in rice, most notably at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines, which released the IR-8 rice strain in 1968. This "miracle" rice is a cross between a Chinese semi-dwarf strain and a tall Indonesian strain that yields three times the amount of grain as the older types. Originally, the IR-8 strain was a bit chalky, with a strange taste; however, these defects have been overcome and other improvements made by further breeding.

      Find out more about this book:

      Encyclopedia of Healing Foods
      Buy book
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

      Though heating home with a wood fire seems more romantic than a Shakespearean poet, wood smoke is much more carcinogenic than cigarette smoke and a contributor to particle pollution in neighborhoods.

    • 1 Answer
      A
      No, ingredients found in nature can be harmful and should meet the same safety standards as those derived from petroleum. Some cleaning supplies contain substances such as linalool, eugenol and limonene, which are natural components of essential oils that can trigger allergic reactions.
       
      Citrus or pine oil cleaners emit chemicals called terpenes that react with traces of ozone in the air to form formaldehyde. (Tip: avoid citrus or pine oil cleaners, especially on smoggy days when the ozone level is elevated.) There are no regulations in the U.S. that require cleaning supplies advertised as “natural” or “organic” to support those claims. Even products bearing the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s “organic” seal contain ingredients from plants grown without artificial pesticides and fertilizers, but these products aren’t automatically safer for you or the environment.
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Internal Medicine, answered

      You really don't have to plug in the vacuum (one of the most wasteful uses of energy) to pick up every dog hair on the floor. For smooth surfaces, consider rubber-bristle brooms and a dustpan. After you use them, you'll wonder why you traded in brooms for vacuums in the first place. (If you really want to save time and energy, a dog with a long tongue will keep your kitchen floor clean.) A Swiffer works with electrostatic energy to attract dust.

    • 2 Answers
      A
      A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
      You can use baking soda (also called bicarbonate of soda) for more than just your morning muffins. It can help you scrub challenging areas, like baked-on grease on the stove and soap buildup on the tub. To neutralize odors in your refrigerator (or any space), put out an open box of baking soda.

      Vinegar is another very effective cleaning agent. It is best to choose vinegar labeled as grain alcohol or neutral grain spirits, or choose one that lists the natural ingredients it is derived from. For an all-purpose disinfecting cleaner, mix equal parts vinegar and water in a spray bottle. Just avoid using vinegar on tile grout and marble.

      This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
      See All 2 Answers
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , Internal Medicine, answered

      Batteries, fluorescent light bulbs, and electronic devices can all be recycled, in addition to well-known biggies like glass, paper, and plastic. In fact, over 60 million tons of materials are now recycled, which is about a third of our waste. A good start, but this percentage needs to double.