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How do I care for someone with gestational trophoblastic tumor?

Caring for a woman with gestational trophoblastic tumor (GTT) involves helping them deal with the effects of the disease and its treatment. The exact type of care she will need depends on the type of tumor, how much it has spread, and the treatment she has received. It is very important that you make sure that the woman attends all medical appointments and follows all instructions for her treatment. Even after successful treatment, follow-up appointments with the doctor are necessary, because GTT may come back.

In addition, many women with GTT will need emotional support. Most GTTs arise during pregnancy, and there are often significant feelings of loss for the pregnancy. You should provide whatever support is necessary, and enlist others, such as family members, friends, support groups, and professionals, to help as needed.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.