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How does exercise help prevent gestational diabetes?

Exercise can help prevent gestational diabetes. Start by planning your pregnancy if at all possible. Be physically active 150 minutes per week (10 minutes at a time is fine, such as a brisk walk, bike ride or swim). Eat healthy foods (think more fruits and vegetables and whole grains) and be mindful of your eating habits; minimize intake of processed foods and fast food. Lose excess pounds before becoming pregnant. These can all help to lower your risk for gestational diabetes.
Women who engage in regular exercise before pregnancy have a lower risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a form of diabetes that affects pregnant women who have never before suffered from diabetes. A study followed 21,765 women for eight years and discovered that those who engaged in vigorous physical activity had a lower risk of developing GDM than those who did not exercise.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.