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Do mitochondrial diseases affect children differently than adults?

Diana Meeks
Diana Meeks on behalf of Sigma Nursing
Family Practitioner

Most mitochondrial diseases appear in children or teens. Adults can develop adult-onset disease, usually coming after a significant illness, which usually indicates that the adult has carried the defective gene since birth. Adults are affected similarly to children. However, many sufferers of adult-aging diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke have been discovered to have defective mitochondria as well.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.