Advertisement

What is the function of the hamstring muscles?

Rick Olderman
Physical Therapy

On the back of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which have origins at the back of the ilium as well as on the back of the thigh bone. The hamstrings attach to the lower leg bone and bend the knee joint. They also assist in extending the hip. They aren't designed to be the primary hip extensor though, so they don't control the femur head very well. This becomes significant in the presence of weak gluteals (gluteus maximus and gluteus medius). When the gluteals are weak, the hamstrings will pick up the slack; this contributes to improper femoral head tracking in the hip socket and, consequently, hip or pelvic pain.

 

Fixing You: Hip & Knee Pain: Self-treatment for IT band friction, arthritis, groin pain, bursitis, knee pain, PFS, AKPS, and other diagnoses

More About this Book

Fixing You: Hip & Knee Pain: Self-treatment for IT band friction, arthritis, groin pain, bursitis, knee pain, PFS, AKPS, and other diagnoses

Hip and knee pain are often a result of poor pelvic muscle performance in combination with poor walking habits. This combination creates tracking problems in the hip socket or excessive rotation at...

Continue Learning about Functions of Muscles

When will I start to lose lean muscle mass?
Dr. Vonda Wright, MDDr. Vonda Wright, MD
We lose lean muscle mass beginning around age 50. By age 80, we have lost 50 percent of our lean mus...
More Answers
How many muscles does it take to frown?
Discovery HealthDiscovery Health
Science doesn't have a definitive number, in spite of what you might have heard or read in an e-mail...
More Answers
What is the difference between fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles?
National Athletic Trainers' AssociationNational Athletic Trainers' Association
Fast-twitch muscles are used in quick, forceful muscle contractions such as sprinting or power l...
More Answers
What is the Phosphagen System?
Discovery HealthDiscovery Health
Every muscle cell has some amount of ATP. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the way your body uses bio...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.