Advertisement

Can I lift more often if I'm not playing in games this year?

Definitely!  If you are practicing regularly, then keep your training frequency to 3 times per week for 1 hour each session. Perform total body lifts each workout and split your routine accordingly to achieve balance amongst all of your muscles. End load the week with your more fatiguing workouts, so that you can use the weekend to recover. If you are limited or not practicing, a 2 day split for a total of four training sessions per week is acceptable.  If you are in rehab for an injury, keep the lifting sessions to 1 hour per session and stay within the guidelines of your prescribed protocol. If you are medically cleared, you must add in some movement training amongst the lifting so that you can ensure you are still training for football and not bodybuilding. And most importantly, if you do have an opportunity to play on weekends, err on the side of caution. Nothing is more frustrating than when your training thwarts your efforts on the field.  It's important to keep yourself relatively fresh and temper your drive to get bigger and stronger until the next off-season. 

Continue Learning about Football

What's the test to truly assess speed on the football field?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
The 40 yard dash has usually been the standard in this field and is the test that has accumulate...
More Answers
What's better for football - the traditional squat or lunges?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
First determine the goal of the exercise, that can help you decide. There are merits for both lifts ...
More Answers
What stretches should I do after a football game to help recovery?
National Academy of Sports MedicineNational Academy of Sports Medicine
To promote optimal recovery right after practice, perform these three stretches of the muscles most ...
More Answers
Why is there a warning sticker on all football helmets?
National Athletic Trainers' AssociationNational Athletic Trainers' Association
The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) has developed stan...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.