Food Allergies Treatment

Food Allergies Treatment

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    There is no cure for fructose intolerance, but doctors have identified the gene that causes it. You can be tested to determine if you are a carrier and what your odds may be of passing the disease to your children. If you have fructose intolerance, you can minimize your symptoms by avoiding foods that contain fructose. Try to avoid sugar, soft drinks, desserts, and fruits like cherries, apples, grapes, and pears.

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    A few research centers throughout the country have children and adults enrolled in trials involving oral and sublingual immunotherapy. This therapy, in which patients with allergies are given small but increasing amounts of the food they are allergic to, shows promise. Right now, significant debate exists as to whether this therapy might lead to a permanent change in the patient’s immune system or just a temporary state of tolerance.
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    Serious allergic reactions to foods resulting in anaphylaxis require emergency treatment with a medication called epinephrine. For more mild food allergy symptoms such as itchy and watery eyes, a stuffy nose and sneezing, an over-the-counter antihistamine such as Benadryl is usually effective.
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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    The long-term treatment plans for food allergy and food intolerance are very different. Remember when you were a kid and got vaccines so that your immune system would protect you against all those diseases? A food allergy is also an immune response and your body thinks it is now “protecting” you against the food. The problem is that a food allergy is often a lifelong problem. As a result, the long-term treatment plan for food allergy includes the following:
    • Avoid the product (likely for life, since your body will always protect you from that food). Accidental exposure could result in death.
    • You will likely need an injectable epinephrine pen, school forms for strict avoidance and an anaphylaxis action plan.
    Food intolerance is different. An intolerance might be lifelong (lactose intolerance or celiac disease) or it might be temporary. If it’s temporary, there is no good way to tell when to bring back the food. You just have to try and see what happens. For this reason, the general plan for intolerance is:
    • Avoid the food (for now). Accidental ingestion will likely trigger your symptoms but will not cause a risk of death.
    • Wait an amount of time. Possibly three months, six months, or a year (discuss this with a healthcare professional).
    • At some point, consider bringing back the product. If you can tolerate it again, great. If not, then remove it again for another period of three to 12 months.
    • There is no need for an epinephrine injector or school forms.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Celebs Ask Dr. Oz: Duff Goldman
    Would you know what to do if someone you love is having a food allergy attack?

    Watch the video to find out from Dr Oz what you should do if someone is having a food allergy attack.


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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    An elimination diet is often recommended when trying to pin down the cause of a possible allergy. While there are many tests out there to test for allergies, an elimination diet, when done correctly, is the one of the best ways to identify the culprit of a food allergy or intolerance. This diet is done by eliminating possible trigger foods, particularly the foods that are typically allergens including: Wheat and gluten, dairy, eggs, nuts, fish, shellfish and soy. A person should plan to stay on a complete elimination diet, avoiding all possible trigger foods, for about 4 days. After that initial elimination, trigger foods will be eaten one at a time, including one particular trigger food 3 times during a day, unless, of course, a reaction occurs! 

    During this diet, a food diary should be kept where all foods that are eaten are recorded and any side effects or reactions are noted. After introducing a food, the individual should plan to go back on the complete elimination diet for 2-3 more days, continuing to record foods and negative reactions in a food diary. One will continue this process of introducing possible trigger foods until the food causing the allergy or intolerance is identified. For a teen, it is important that this diet is monitored by a Registered Dietitian or physician to ensure the proper balance of nutrients are being provided during the elimination period.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Once diagnosed with food allergies, Strict Avoidance is the only method of preventing a food allergic reaction.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    All foods can be introduced after an elimination diet. The important thing is to add them one at a time so that you will know which food is causing a symptom that might come back. So if your migraine headaches went away during an elimination diet and they come back when you eat a certain food, then you know what the culprit is.

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