Food Allergies Symptoms

Food Allergies Symptoms

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    What are the symptoms of an IgE-mediated food allergy?
    The symptoms of an IgE-mediated food allergy can include lip tingling, mouth swelling and throat tightening. In this video, Jessica Savage, MD, Clinical & Laboratory Immunologist at Brigham and Women's hospital describes the variety of symptoms.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    1 068 04 FoodAllergies
    Food allergies can be life threatening, so you should know the common warning signs.

    Watch the video to learn more from Dr. Oz about the most common warning signs of food allergies.


  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    A gluten allergy can be serious, whether you’re just a bit intolerant or have celiac disease. It causes symptoms like bloating, cramping, fatigue, diarrhea and general gastrointestinal issues; it can even predispose you to liver disease or cancer.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    The symptoms of a dairy allergy are widespread. People with this allergy typically have gas, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Food allergies cause widespread inflammation and may cause malabsorption, leading to iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis and other diseases.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    No. The symptoms develop within minutes or up to 2 hours after a person has eaten food that contains the allergen. If you experience similar symptoms over 2 hours later, see your doctor to rule out other possibilities.

    The only exception is that a breastfed baby may develop symptoms between 2 and 8 hours after mom has ingested the allergen.

     

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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Dr. Mark Hyman - Are there food allergy symptoms my doctor might miss?

    Functional Medicine Specialist and family physician Dr. Mark Hyman explains how food allergies could be the cause of symptoms your doctor may be missing. Watch Dr. Hyman's video for information about functional medicine and your overall health.


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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    The most common symptoms of a milk allergy include:
    • Skin reactions: itchy red rash; hives; eczema; swelling of lips, mouth, tongue, face, or throat; or allergic "shiners" (black eyes)
    • Stomach reactions: abdominal pain and bloating, diarrhea (usually very runny), vomiting, gas, or cramps
    • Nose, throat, and lung reactions: runny nose, sneezing, water or itchy eyes, coughing, wheezing, or shortness of breath
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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    Food allergy and intolerance symptoms differ. The symptoms of a food allergy tend to be relatively predictable, and include the following:
    • Hives/welts: These skin reactions happen in about 90 percent of patients with an allergy. Hives tend to be itchy welts with individual lesions lasting more than 24 hours, although the total rash itself might come and go over more than a day. If you break out in a rash, take pictures to show your healthcare professional.
    • Swelling (angioedema): There may also be swelling of the mouth, face, hands, feet or groin area.
    • You may experience abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or loose stools.
    • You might get lightheaded, or feel dizzy or about to pass out.
    • Anaphylaxis: Allergic reactions also carry with them the risk of death.
    Since a food intolerance is caused by many different factors, the symptoms are less predictable. One of the keys to diagnosing food intolerance is to make sure it’s not an allergy. If none of the above food allergy symptoms sound like your symptoms, then you more likely have a food intolerance. Typical symptoms might include one or more of the following:
    • Rash: not a hive rash, but a red rash that may or may not be itchy and tends to last for more than 24 hours.
    • There is rarely swelling.
    • There is often abdominal pain, nausea, possibly vomiting, constipation or loose stools. This is a very common symptom with food intolerance.
    • Headaches sometimes happen. But feeling lightheaded, dizzy or passing out is very unusual for a food intolerance.
    • You may feel fatigued or have decreased energy.
    • Weight gain or weight loss is not a usual symptom of intolerance although it can happen. It is always important to search for more common causes of weight changes if this is the only problem.
    An intolerance should not kill you. It might make you feel miserable, but only a food allergy has the risk of death.
  • 8 Answers
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    You will know you have a food allergy if you have signs and symptoms within minutes to a couple hours after exposure to even small amounts of the offending protein. Signs of food allergies include itchy, red rashes; swelling; flushing; nausea; abdominal cramping and diarrhea; stuffy nose; wheezing; racing heart; and metallic taste in your mouth.

    Your doctor will diagnose a food allergy mainly by history, combined with either skin or blood testing for more accuracy. Skin testing can be helpful, but there are many false-positives, which means the test says there is an allergy, but there is not. Negative results on a skin test, however, are very accurate that there is no food allergy, so that can be very reassuring. Blood tests are also poorly predictive, being accurate only roughly half of the time. However, high levels of blood tested antibodies are very suggestive of an allergy to that food.

    If you think you may have a true food allergy, discuss it with your doctor and consider additional testing before permanently restricting your diet. 
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Teenagers typically do not want to seem different from their peers. This is a stage when socialization and friendships have a profound effect. A teenager with food allergies needs to be vigilant about their food allergies while continuing to enjoy life as a teenager. Parents need to be supportive while reminding their teens about "safe" food choices. A registered dietitian specializing in food allergies can be a valuable team member who can support and provide teens with tips to handle various social situations while maintaining food allergy safety.
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