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What are recommendations on giving peanuts to children?

Current recommendations on giving peanuts to children endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics are as follows:
  1. If an infant has severe eczema or other noted allergies, start peanut exposure as early as 4 to 6 months of age, if the infant is ready for solids.
  2. If an infant has mild to moderate eczema, introduce peanut around 6 months of age, if ready for solids.
  3. For a healthy infant with no allergies, introduce peanut around the same time as other solids.
All these recommendations carry the same advise that an infant must be ready for solids. Parents should ask a healthcare provider if they are unsure if their infant is ready for solids.
For giving peanuts to children, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, recommends:
  • Guideline 1: If your infant has severe eczema, egg allergy, or both (conditions that increase the risk of peanut allergy), he or she should have peanut-containing foods introduced into the diet as early as 4 to 6 months of age. This will reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy. Check with your infant's healthcare provider before introducing peanut-containing foods.
  • Guideline 2: If your infant has mild to moderate eczema, he or she may have peanut-containing foods introduced into the diet around 6 months of age to reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy. However, this should be done with your family’s dietary preferences in mind, and after checking with your infant's healthcare provider.
  • Guideline 3: If your infant has no eczema or any food allergy, you can freely introduce peanut-containing foods into his or her diet. This can be done at home in an age-appropriate manner together with other solid foods, keeping in mind your family’s dietary routines.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.