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Will fitness help me deal with the daily stresses I face?

Yes! Eating healthfully and exercising regularly, even if it’s as little as daily walking, help you look and feel better - both of which makes EVERYONE feel less stressed when compared to being out of shape.
We are not sure there is a better way to manage stress than exercise. It is well accepted in the scientific community that exercise counteracts stress-related disorders. Exercise has been proven to be a better strategy for treating depression than any drug on the market. The hormonal changes, including the release of endorphins during and following exercise, naturally soothe the entire body. Exercise and proper diet help keep the brain “young” - i.e. improves cognitive functioning by helping maintain the integrity of your brain cells just like exercise and diet improve your muscle cell functioning. And finally, both short-term exercise and long-term aerobic exercise training are associated with improvements in various aspects of psychological functioning. Cross-sectional studies reveal that compared with sedentary individuals, active persons are more likely to be better adjusted, to perform better on tests of cognitive functioning, to exhibit reduced cardiovascular responses to stress, and to report fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Exercise can help you recharge, and eating properly positively affects the way you look and feel. Any way you slice it, fitness creates a happier, more satisfied person. Once you’ve experienced the euphoric feeling of true fitness, it’s locked in your mind and will emanate throughout your body.
Yes, fitness can be a great way to cope with life's challenges. By including a fitness routine into your daily life, you are providing yourself with a positive outlet for the stress you accumulate throughout each day. Using exercise as an outlet is a much healthier way to deal with these stresses, and it will provide you with many additional positive health benefits including reducing your risk factors for contracting various adverse health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Beyond the physiological benefits, the time you spend exercising can provide some psychological relief as well. Exercising can be a temporary "time out" from the demands of daily life and allows you to focus solely on yourself. Over time, fitness will also allow you to function more easily under difficult situations and thereby hopefully making you able to cope with stress better at its inception. Remember, fitness does not mean you have to devote hours a day slaving away at the gym on treadmills and stair machines. You can find ways to incorporate more exercise and movement into you day. Eventually, you will want to create a routine and program that works best for you.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.