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Is it true that if I feel no pain I get no gain from a workout?

“No pain, no gain” is the mantra of many exercisers and their so-called gurus, who believe that you have to lose copious amounts of sweat and experience severe inflammation and pain after a workout, in order for your workout to be effective. Often times, you are encouraged to push beyond common sense limits, to meet lofty exercise goals. It’s not really a good idea and it can result in severe electrolyte imbalance, injured muscles and joints, and mental burnout. If you’re injured, you can’t work out, so why take the chance?
Two solid exercising principles are cross-training and interval training. Cross training encourages you to switch off between different aerobic equipment machines or exercise routine, so that you work out differently, challenge your body in different ways and maintain challenge in your exercise routine by not “getting used to” the same old approach. Interval training encourages you to improve your overall aerobic fitness and burn more calories, by introducing resistance or speed challenges within a workout of a set time duration. If you are doing an hour of jogging on a treadmill you might introduce 2 minute faster runs every 8 or 9 minutes.
If you feel pain, 24 to 48 hours after a workout, every now and again that’s fine. If you feel like that every time you workout, chances are you will burn out or sustain an injury.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.