Advertisement

How do intermittent and continuous fetal monitoring differ?

There is good evidence that continuous fetal monitoring in uncomplicated pregnancies has done nothing to improve outcomes for babies and mothers but has dramatically increased the cesarean section rate. Unfortunately, for a variety of reasons, continuous fetal monitoring has become the norm in many hospitals.

Continuous fetal heart rate monitoring should be reserved for situations in which epidurals or Pitocin are being used and for women who have certain complications. If you are having a hospital birth and there is no clear-cut medical reason for you to have continuous monitoring, ask your provider to consider intermittent monitoring.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth

More About this Book

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth

ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED TO MAKE WISE DECISIONS ABOUT YOUR PREGNANCY AND THE BIRTH OF YOUR CHILD -- FROM THE EDITORS OF THE CLASSIC "BIBLE OF WOMEN'S HEALTH" Pregnancy and birth are as ordinary...

Continue Learning about Fetal Development Basics & Pregnancy

What role do T cells and B cells play in fetal immunity?
Dr. Michael Roizen, MDDr. Michael Roizen, MD
A fetus's early immunity comes in the form of T cells and the primitive Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), ...
More Answers
What is gestational age?
RealAgeRealAge
Gestational age is the age of a pregnancy calculated as the number of weeks that have elapsed from t...
More Answers
What are some effects of poor fetal nutrition?
Dr. Michael Roizen, MDDr. Michael Roizen, MD
In utero, if you feed your baby fewer nutrients, you're programming your child to expect an environm...
More Answers
What should I do if I can't feel my baby move during the third trimester?
Count the KicksCount the Kicks
If you cannot feel the baby move during kick counts in the third trimester, drink a glass of juice o...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.