Advertisement

How can I lower my triglyceride levels?

Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Internal Medicine
Because triglyceride levels fluctuate a fair amount, people with high levels (above 190 mg/dl) will want to have their blood analyzed several times to get an accurate estimate. If your fasting triglyceride level is above 209 mg/dl, reduce total fat and simple sugar intake. Cutting saturated and trans fats to less than 7 percent of your total caloric intake, eating fish rich in omega-3 oils at least three times a week, reducing simple sugars as much as you can, reducing weight, and increasing physical activity are all actions to try before considering possible drug therapies.
The RealAge Makeover: Take Years off Your Looks and Add Them to Your Life

More About this Book

The RealAge Makeover: Take Years off Your Looks and Add Them to Your Life

Why not live at 60 feeling like you did at 35?Thousands of Americans are younger today than they were five years ago. How is that possible? By following the specific recommendations that reverse...
Anthony L. Komaroff, MD
Internal Medicine
The NCEP guidelines define normal fasting triglyceride levels as below 150 mg/dL. High triglyceride levels can result from obesity, physical inactivity, tobacco exposure, alcohol abuse, uncontrolled diabetes, and even certain medications, as well as some genetic disorders.

Often, triglycerides can be lowered using the same steps that help bring down low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Eating healthful foods is important. This means reducing saturated and trans fats, and choosing whole grains and other slowly digested carbohydrates in place of rapidly digested carbohydrates such as sugar, white rice, and foods made from white flour. Exercising more often, losing weight, and avoiding tobacco in all its forms can help. Some people need to take a triglyceride-lowering medication.
Jennifer N. Caudle, DO
Family Medicine

Lowering triglyceride levels is similar to that of lowering cholesterol; diet, exercise and medication are all key. Watch family medicine physician Jennifer Caudle, DO, discuss how avoiding cholesterol/fats and increasing fiber can make a big impact.


Continue Learning about Fats

All About YOU: Getting More Better-for-You Fats
All About YOU: Getting More Better-for-You Fats
Corn oil, margarine, steak . . . if these items make a regular appearance in your diet, you may need more "3s." That's omega-3s—found in foods like f...
Read More
What is the role of prostaglandins in my body?
Michael T. Murray, NDMichael T. Murray, ND
Prostaglandins carry out many important tasks in the body, including the regulation of:Allergic resp...
More Answers
What is hydrogenated fat?
Learn Your LipidsLearn Your Lipids
Hydrogenated fat/hydrolyzed fat/hardened fat are all different names for the same fat. This fat begi...
More Answers
Beware of Soup, Sauce and Salad Dressing
Beware of Soup, Sauce and Salad Dressing

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.