Eye and Vision

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    Before you have PRK surgery, your ophthalmologist will give you a complete, preoperative eye exam to measure your prescription and check for any conditions that might affect the procedure. Your ophthalmologist will determine if you are a good candidate for PRK based on this examination. 
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    IOL implants are well tolerated by the eye and are intended to last for a lifetime. Only rarely do the lenses need to be removed and replaced. 
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    The term ulcer is most commonly used to refer to a corneal ulcer.  The most common cause of corneal ulcer is bacterial infection from contact lens use.  One may also get bacterial infections from eyelid bacteria seen in blepharitis.  Viruses such as herpes simplex and varicella zoster can cause corneal ulcers.  Severe dry eyes can cause ulcers as well.  Exposure of the eye in the case of poor functioning of eyelids also predisposes to an ulcer.  Corneal ulcers can also be due to inflammation without infection and they can also be a form of degeneration in the cornea that is either age or inheritance. Any type of ulcer of the cornea is a medical emergency that must be attended to by an Eye M.D. as soon as possible.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    The following are first aid treatment guidelines for chemical eye burns:
    • Don't delay. Begin flushing immediately. Hold the lids open and pour fresh water over eye or position under slowly running water. Water should flow from the inner area of the eye next to the nose to the outer area, to avoid contamination of the other eye.
    • Flush for at least 20 continuous minutes before you go for medical attention. It is the duration -- not the amount of irrigating -- that is important.
    • Get medical attention for any chemical burns of the eyes.
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    A , Ophthalmology, answered
    Therre are many types of inflammation of the cornea ("keratitis"). If the keratitis is caused by the contact lens, solutions. or over use, it is generally better to discontinue the contacts use until this or other types of keratitis clear up before laser surgery should be pursued. Remember the laser prints a permanent correction or the patient's cornea and it is always best if all conditions are at their best before this treatment is performed. Hence clear up all problems before the laser treatment is performed. 
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    Keratitis causes several symptoms, including:

    • Red eye
    • Foreign body sensation
    • Pain
    • Sensitivity to light
    • Watery eyes
    • Blurred vision
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    To diagnose keratitis, cultures are taken from the cornea. Sometimes a biopsy needs to be performed.

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    She should choose glasses and be thankful that she didn't lose her sight or require corneal transplant for the scar.  If she insists on wearing them anyway, at least switch to gas-permeable lenses which have a somewhat lower risk, but never, never sleep in the lenses.  But, my best advice is to stop wearing contact lenses altogether.  She has a long life ahead with only the one pair of eyes.
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    Sometimes, there's nothing you can do to prevent keratitis. If you've had herpes simplex in the past, the virus might spontaneously spread to your eye, causing keratitis, which is beyond your control. Other times, keratitis is preventable. Maintaining proper health and hygiene habits when putting in and taking out your contacts can help prevent keratitis. If you know your eyes have a tendency to be dry, take steps to keep them well-hydrated, since keratitis tends to develop in people with extremely dry eyes.

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    A answered
    Digital illustration of various areas of cortex in human brain receiving input from sense organs
    You have one optic nerve in each eye, with each one about as thick as a pencil. These nerves connect your eyes to your brain, so they're critical for vision. When you see something with your eye, the optic nerve sends a picture of it to your brain. Your brain then interprets the image. Pressure on the optic nerve or damage to it can lead to vision problems or vision loss. Conditions that can cause pressure, inflammation, or damage on the optic nerve include glaucoma, complications of multiple sclerosis (MS), fibro-osseous lesions (bone overgrowth), head injuries, some uncommon genetic disorders (including dominant optic atrophy), and tumors.
    Digital illustration of various areas of cortex in human brain receiving input from sense organs